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Here you will find blog posts about upcoming events, scripts from our popular YouTube Channel, and important shop updates!

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Peterbilt 379

https://youtu.be/7tHK2_ZPb3M

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we are here with episode 9 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… On this episode, we are going through 10 facts you probably didn’t know about the truck of choice within the show truck circuit, the beloved Peterbilt 379. Let’s get started guys!

               

  1. The Peterbilt 379 was the largest highway truck sold by the company at its launch and is among the most recognizable big rigs in existence. Since its release in 1987, Peterbilt has produced over 230,000 Model 379s with more than 89% still in operation today. This iconic truck held the #1 place as Peterbilt’s top-selling vehicle for the entirety of its 20-year production span, as well as the #1 place in the hearts of truckers around the globe, to this day.
  2. The cab structure of the 379 is shared with numerous Peterbilt conventional trucks produced, and surprisingly shares the same doors sported on the 362 and 273 cabover engine models. The 379 also obviously shared many similarities with its predecessor, the 359; including the lightest cab and bunk available on the market at the time.  
  3. Throughout its production, the 379 was equipped with the most powerful engines offered in Class 8 on-highway vehicles. CAT, Cummins and Detroit Diesels were the three most popular engines to choose from for the 379. However, the roomy engine bay of the 379 allowed any engine and transmission combination to fit, making the truck extremely versatile. If you’d like to learn more about the history of the above-mentioned engines, check out our newest series, Diesel History, on our channel! 😊
  4. British boxer Chris Eubank is a huge collector of vehicles small and large and owns a customized Peterbilt 379. This 379 is even complete with an appropriate license plate that reads “1 KO.”
  5. The 1998 film, “Black Dog,” is a lesser known movie that features a Peterbilt 379 truck, as well as a star-studded cast. Starring the late, great Patrick Swayze, as well as music icons Randy Travis and Meat Loaf. In the movie, Swayze’s character, Jack Crews, is a truck driver who was recently released from prison for vehicular manslaughter, causing him to lose his CDL. However, to pay off his debt and turn a new leaf, Jack is forced to run one final load. After initially being given a brand-new truck to haul, Crews instead chooses an older 379 model. After all, there ain’t nothin’ finer than a 379-er! 😉
  6. In April of 2007, the last 379 ever produced, a fully-loaded Peterbilt 379 Legacy Class Edition, rolled out of the Denton, Texas plant. This final 379 truck was also the 1000th Legacy Class Edition model and was delivered to a Peterbilt-exclusive fleet company called TWX Corporation based in Two Rivers, Wisconsin. Proud owners Kevin and Laurie Hagenow were able to accompany the truck through the entirety of its assembly process and even drove the truck off the production line.
  7. Despite being one the most expensive trucks on the market, the resale value of the 379 was and still remains the best in the industry. In fact, after its discontinuation in 2007, the 379’s resale value has only continued to increase over the years and is better now than it ever has been.
  8. As most of you already know, a Pete 379 was used in the Transformers movie as Optimus Prime. This 379 was specially tricked out with tons of custom chrome for the film. In fact, the stacks featured on the infamous Optimus Prime truck are Dynaflex exhaust, which you can find at many chrome shops including your very own, Jack’s Chrome. 😊
  9. Speaking of the Optimus Prime Pete, the 379 was purchased in 2016 at a Barrett-Jackson Collector-Car Auction in Scottsdale, Arizona. The truck was bought by Rick Hendrick, owner of Hendrick Motorsports for $121,000.
  10. 379’s is most famous for their elegant long-nose style and luxurious ride. The interiors of all Petermobiles, especially the 379, are said to be the vehicles biggest selling point. In addition to their immaculate beauty, the 379 also has a far roomier cab with much more leg-room for our vertically blessed drivers.

                That’s it for our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the Peterbilt 379. Thank you so much for watching! If you liked this video, give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel so you don’t miss out on any of our future videos! If you want to see more fun facts about your favorite rigs, be sure to watch our other episodes of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… located on our channel. If you’d like to learn even more about Peterbilt trucks, check out our plethora of Pete content including: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the Peterbilt 359 as well as the Peterbilt 389, History of the Square Hood Pete and even the complete History of Peterbilt Motors Company!

                If you’d like to dive even deeper under the hoods of some of your favorite trucks, check out our newest series, Diesel History on our YouTube channel! We’ve compiled Truck History, Diesel History and our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… series into one convenient place at JacksChromeShow.com. Merch is coming soon for all of our series, so if you’d like to support the channel, head on over to our website and be sure to use promo code YOUTUBE to save 15%!

                This show is made possible by our online chrome shop, Jack’s Chrome. Head on over to our website www.JacksChromeShop.com and check out our wide variety of headlights, steering wheels, grills, fenders, detail products, Jack’s Chrome Shop exclusive apparel, posters and so much more! Save stacks when you shop at Jack’s and use promo code “YOUTUBE” at checkout to save 15% off your order.

                Don’t forget to tune into our channel on Monday for our podcast highlights and check out the live show on Chrome and Steel Radio YouTube and Facebook at 12pm EST on Wednesdays. Links to the podcast and everything else we mentioned in this video will be in the description below. Thanks so much for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember guys, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Peterbilt 359

https://youtu.be/9sNOWWn2nr0

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we are back with episode 5 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… On this episode, we talk about 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the classic Peterbilt 359 model. Test your knowledge of Peterbilt’s first flagship conventional truck in today’s video. Let’s get started!

  1. The 359 was Peterbilt’s first conventional style truck and the company’s top of the line on-highway truck at the time. The 359 model truly helped shape Peterbilt into the company that it is today. The 359 still remains one of the most popular owner-operator trucks, and is also one of the most popular models on the show truck scene.
  2. The 359 model was built with an all-aluminum body, which not only extended the life and corrosion resistance of the unit, but made for a much more lightweight truck. If a trucker was looking for the lightest weight rig possible, the 359 could be ordered with not only an all-aluminum cab and bunk: even the frame could be ordered in aluminum.
  3. The Peterbilt 359 truck sports a huge engine compartment, which allowed almost any engine to be spec’ed for an order. The fan-favorite engine at the time of the 359’s release, the 3408 Cat engine, could fit under the hood of a 359 and was the most popular engine choice for the model.
  4. Another advantage of the 359’s larger engine bay was that it allowed virtually any transmission to be used, including the transmission of choice at the time, the Spicer 604. With the countless engine and transmission combinations, the 359 proved very versatile and could be designed for logging, produce work, and various other types of specialized trucking.
  5. Although traditionally thought to be “379” style headlights, the first set of rectangular headlamps were actually debuted on a 359 truck and can be seen in the 1978 “Best in Class” brochure. This same truck, nick-named “Big Mamoo,” also debuted Peterbilt’s 63” sleeper with rounded doors and a walk-through cab.
  6. The first movie in the famous “The Fast and the Furious” film series features a blue Peterbilt 359 involved in a car chase with the main character, Dominic Torretto, played by actor Vin Diesel. This is the same black Peterbilt truck used in the 2001 film, “Joy Ride,” with the late Paul Walker, but painted blue with slight modifications added.
  7. 359 trucks have had various appearances in numerous movies and tv shows such as: The Dark Knight, Sons of Anarchy, 2 Broke Girls, any many more. Cartoon versions of the classic 359 model have even been depicted in animated tv series like Bob’s Burgers and The Simpsons.
  8. When Peterbilt announced their decision to discontinue the 359 model, many people believed that meant the company was retiring it’s long hood truck all together. This caused a rush of people to buy these later 359 trucks which further drove their sales and increased their demand, a rather smart marketing move by the company.
  9. It is said that nearly 9000 of the special 359 custom rigs were built in the final year of production in 1987, but to this day, there are mixed stories on the subject. However, the true numbered 359 Classics can still be checked on a factory list by their serial number for authenticity.
  10. With the huge used big rig market, the Peterbilt 359 has excellent resale value even to this day. Despite it’s assorted electrical and mechanical issues, the 359 has acquired quite a cult following and an extremely loyal fan base over the years, that keep the legendary long nose truck rollin’.

                That’s all for our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the Peterbilt 359. Thank you so much for watching! If you liked this video, give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel so you don’t miss out on any of our future videos! If you want to see more content like this, be sure to watch our other episodes of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… located on our channel. If you’d like to learn even more about Peterbilt, check out our variety of Pete content including History of the Peterbilt Square Hood Truck, 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the Peterbilt 389, and even the entire History of Peterbilt Motors Company.                 This show is made possible by our online chrome shop, Jack’s Chrome. Head on over to our website www.JacksChromeShop.com and check out our huge selection of fenders, steering wheels, headlights, detail products, Jack’s Chrome Shop exclusive posters, apparel and so much more! Save stacks when you shop at Jack’s and use promo code “YOUTUBE” at checkout to save 15% off your order. Don’t forget to tune into our channel on Monday for our podcast highlights and check out the live show on Chrome and Steel Radio YouTube and Facebook at 12pm EST on Wednesdays. Links to the podcast and everything else we mentioned in this video will be in the description below. Thanks for watching, see you next week and remember guys, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… PACCAR Inc.:

https://youtu.be/7_pWxwNx90A

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we are here with our first double-digit episode #10 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… You might’ve seen the 10th episode of our fan-favorite Truck History series, featuring the History of one of the best-known names in the trucking industry, PACCAR Inc. Well today for our 10th episode of our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About series, we will be taking you through 10 fun facts about the powerhouse parent company of both Peterbilt and Kenworth, PACCAR Inc. Let’s get started!

  1. Although most well-known for their 2 biggest brands, Peterbilt Motors Company and Kenworth Trucks; PACCAR Inc. also own the major European truck manufacturer, DAF Trucks. In addition to truck manufacturing companies, PACCAR also designs and manufactures diesel engines, provides financial services and information technology, and distributes truck parts through its supplementary brands PACCAR Powertrain,  PACCAR Financial, PacLease, PACCAR Parts, and PACCAR Winch; all of which are related to its principal business of truck manufacturing.
  2. PACCAR Inc. is a fortune 500 company and counts among the largest medium- and heavy-duty commercial vehicle manufacturers in the world. PACCAR has been an international manufacturer since 1960 and serves customers worldwide with a few exceptions… including: Iran, Cuba, Syria, Sudan and North Korea.
  3. PACCAR and its brands have earned various awards and accolades throughout the years. In 2006, PACCAR was awarded perhaps their most prestigious accolade; the National Medal of Technology (the nation’s highest award for innovation) at the White House by President George W. Bush. PACCAR earned this honor for its leadership in the development of lightweight, aerodynamic commercial vehicles that have significantly reduced fuel consumption and increased productivity across the transportation industry.
  4. Speaking of awards… 3 years later in 2009, PACCAR was also presented with the highly prestigious J.D. Power and Associates Founder’s Award for its long-standing commitment to customer satisfaction in the commercial-vehicle industry. This Founder’s Award is a discretionary award only presented periodically, and during J.D. Power and Associates 40+ year history, only 23 other companies or individuals had received this award.
  5. In November of 2014, Kenworth produced its one millionth truck at its Chillicothe, Ohio plant. The truck, a full-loaded T680 model; was built for TransAm Trucking and powered by PACCAR’s very own MX-13 engine. Kenworth’s sister company and fellow PACCAR brand, Peterbilt; was not far behind and in January of 2018, also produced its one millionth truck, a Model 567 Heritage.
  6. As the parent company to both of the biggest truck manufacturing brands, PACCAR has been able to enjoy the success of each respective brand for decades. However, throughout the years, there have been a few occasions where PACCAR came close to consolidating their Peterbilt and Kenworth brands to form one huge, overarching truck manufacturing brand. As tempting an offer as that may seem, thankfully, PACCAR decided to keep the two companies separate entities, thus giving way to many more models to come.
  7. PACCAR has always had deep roots in the state of Washington, specifically in Renton, where the company’s assembly plant remains the oldest continually operating business. This same Renton plant, has been recognized as one of the best workplaces for five consecutive years by the National Center for Transit Research and has also earned several awards for its exceptional efforts to reduce, reuse and recycle.
  8. At the beginning of 2019, PACCAR announced its plans to team up with Toyota to produce Class 8 trucks that are powered by hydrogen fuel cells instead of diesel, in hopes to reduce emissions in extremely polluted L.A. ports. Although met with harsh criticism from competitors including Tesla CEO, Elon Musk, who refers to the technology as “fool cells,” PACCAR and Toyota believe that hydrogen fuel cells to be a faster, more logical way to carry energy in heavy duty trucks.
  9. Just before Christmas in 2018, PACCAR unveiled perhaps its most controversial truck ever with the release of the Kenworth W990. The W990 was presented as the model to replace the W900 and was overwhelmingly disliked by drivers at its launch. Although Kenworth clarified the W990 was NOT the replacement for the beloved W900, the company has continued to catch flak from countless Kenworth collectors and drivers who were outraged by the aerodynamically advanced look and feel of the new W990 truck. Many diehard PACCAR truckers believe the W990 does not belong in the same model line as the legendary W900 truck and several have speculated for Kenworth to eventually cave and replace the W900 with the W990. While we hope that isn’t the case, whether you love it or hate it, the W990 is here to stay as Kenworth’s new long-nose conventional truck.
  10. As we mentioned earlier, in addition to acquiring the 2 largest American truck manufacturers Peterbilt and Kenworth; PACCAR also acquired the European truck manufacturer, DAF Trucks, in 1996. DAF Trucks is a Dutch truck company that was founded in 1928 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. DAF Trucks have been building their own engines in Europe since the late 1950s, and it was the acquisition of DAF that later led PACCAR to unveil their very own, North American engine line with the new MX engine series in 2010. If you’d like to learn more about DAF Trucks, stay tuned to our channel for more DAF Trucks content to come! 😉

                Before you leave though, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We are quickly approaching 10,000 subscribers and we’re grateful for all your support for the show. If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We are bringing back the 60 Second Truck Tour series very soon and will be releasing shirts for our Diesel History and Truck History fans on Black Friday. You can find both the 60 Second Truck Tour series and our shirts on JacksChromeShow.com so make sure you swing by. If you’re in the mood for some chrome, drop by our chrome shop’s website JacksChromeShop.com and save on your order by using the discount code “YouTube”. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Marmon Trucks:

https://youtu.be/vxYKZws9PdM

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we have episode #26 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… In today’s video we will be moving through the most interesting facts you might not have known about the marvelous Marmon Trucks. But before we get started, this video was made possible by our online chrome shop, jackschromeshop.com. Be sure to stop by the site and sweep through our selection of sales including 10% off bumpers, visors, stacks, and so much more and remember folks… “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

  1. Maybe one of America’s most historic automobiles of all time was made by none other than Marmon Motors with the Model 32 in 1908. The fan-favorite Model 32 was made even more famous 3 years later in 1911, when 2 additional cylinders were added, and former dentist turned racecar driver Ray Harroun led the legendary “Wasp” to victory by winning the first ever Indianapolis 500. Although originally dubbed the “Yellow Jacket” by the media, the nickname was later whittled down to the “Wasp” which was adorned with a brilliant black and yellow paint scheme as well as the world’s very first rear view mirror ever featured on a vehicle. 
  2. Speaking of historic racer Ray Harroun… In addition to all his incredible accomplishments surrounding the “Wasp,” including the introduction of his incredibly innovative above-mentioned rear view mirror model, eliminating the need for the extra weight of a mechanic to ride along with the driver to warn of oncoming cars; Harroun also introduced a few other industry firsts, including the first single-seater “monoposto” design to ever be manufactured, which also made its debut on the Marmon Model 32 “Wasp”, as well as building the first bumper ever for an automobile.
  3. Continuing on the wonder that is the “Wasp,” although the car could go far faster than 75mph, racecar driver Ray Harroun had calculated that speeds soaring above 80mph took a disastrous toll on tires. For this reason, Harroun held off on speed and instead, carefully timed out his tire changes, totaling only 4 pitstops as opposed to the 14+ taken by other teams as they tore around the track at top speeds.
  4. Fast forwarding a few years to era of The Great Depression and the launch of Marmon’s luxurious “Sixteen” model in 1931; Despite the debut of their darling V-16 design, the drastic economic downturn saw sales fall sharply for Marmon Motors. In order to keep their brand and business booming, Marmon Motor Car Company teamed together with ex-military engineer Arthur Herrington, who helped create the new company called Marmon-Herrington and design all-new all-wheel-drive vehicles, which would quickly become the company’s calling. These trucks took Marmon back to the top and successfully sealed the deal with the U.S. military to start making their new models.
  5. Construction of the above-mentioned military models mainly utilized parts produced by other manufacturers, focusing almost fully on Ford’s light duty line. These all-wheel-drive conversions were created by the company and subsequently sold to both the U.S. as well as several foreign governments, with the most major models made being the massive M-22 tank, the Marmon-Herrington Armored Car, and the most massive Marmon model ever built for oil pipe construction in Iraq.
  6. Skipping ahead to the dawn of the 60s decade… the Marmon brand made major moves in the industry in 1963, as they opened up operations in Garland, Texas and took on a new name as the Marmon Motor Company. This took the trucks from their first major Marmon-Herrington manufacturing facility in Indianapolis, IN, approximately 1 hour away from our home here at Jack’s Chrome, which had previously been the old Duesenberg assembly plant prior, up until 1937. However, due to several setbacks in the selling process, Marmon Motor Company didn’t begin manufacturing new makes and models until the following decade in 1973 – when they came out with their cult-classic couple of cabover and conventional configured trucks.
  7. After a somewhat slow start, Marmon’s “rare breed” rigs really ramped up in the early 80s, when the company came out with their classic cabover and conventionals in 1981. These Marmon’s were made in 2 main model series – F for fleet owners and P for premium owner-operators – with the latter launched as a more lavish, luxurious option that included improvements to the interior and stylish paint schemes. Perhaps the most popular of these Marmon models were from the premium line, with the classic 110P cabover and the 57P conventional configuration. In fact, it was primarily the launch of these low-production, premium models that led Marmon’s to be referred to as the “Rolls Royce” of big rigs, due to their history of handmade, hand-tooled one-of-a-kind trucks.
  8. A little later on came the launch of the lightweight 57L, adapted as the all-new affordable, aerodynamically-advanced option. These sleek semitractors saw a slightly slanted hood and a lighter weight, which only added to its aerodynamic abilities. In February of 1997, the last Marmon truck to roll off the assembly line in Garland, Texas, was none other than a 57L aero-truck. This 250 inch wheelbased big rig was bought by a couple, Ken and Carol Matuszak, on February 5th of that same year, who have held onto the historic Marmon model to this day.
  9. Speaking of the above-mentioned 57L model, after its introduction, sales started to shrivel up, largely due to a soft market and small dealer networks that couldn’t compete with the more major manufacturers. In fact, these dramatic drops in sales saw the integration of International Harvester into Marmon’s manufacturing facility, who stepped in to lease 2 of the 3 operating assembly lines and would eventually evolve many of Marmon’s models into their Navistar Paystar Division.
  10. The legendary Marmon lineup has lasted many years and has seen several company changes including many mergers. After the main merging into the Marmon-Herrington company, the business blossomed and began attracting the attention of prominent people such as the Pritzker family, who bought and then subsequently sold all of the assets to the Space Corporation. In 1997, Space Corp. leased out their last assembly line, effectively selling out of the company completely and closing their doors down forever. This was largely the last we had heard from the marvelous Marmon brand, up until 10 years later in 2007; when Warren Buffet bought the historic Marmon Holdings, under his biggest brand, the Berkshire Hathaway Inc. Today, Marmon remains a separate entity under the Berkshire Hathaway umbrella, making more than $8 billion a year with its more than 400 manufacturing, distributing and service facilities worldwide.

                Thank you so much for watching our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Marmon Trucks. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We have finally reached our goal of 25K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show! Next stop, 50K 😉

                If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our podcast “The Chrome Corner” Wednesday’s at 12PM/NOON EST, and join Dave and Maddie as they answer viewer’s questions and discuss all things chrome! 😉

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Be sure to buy your big rig the best Chrome for your Home with some sweet stainless sales on our website at jackschromeshop.com. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Mack Trucks

https://youtu.be/8KmhBK2fyAo

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and I’m here today with another episode of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… In this episode, we are going over 10 Things You Didn’t Know About one of the oldest, most-loved truck brands in the world, Mack Trucks. So for all you tried and true, die-hard Mack fanatics, test your knowledge of the beloved Bulldog brand in today’s video. Let’s jump right in!

  1. Five different Mack brothers have been involved with the company over the life of the company. This includes the original founders, John or “Jack” Mack and Augustus or “Gus” Mack. These two were eventually joined by other brothers, William, Joseph, and Charles Mack.
  2. The youngest of the aforementioned brothers, “Jack” Mack, ran away from his home in Pennsylvania in 1878 at the age of 14, to join the Teamsters and work as a stationary mechanic. Ironically, Jack was later killed in a car accident after his car collided with a trolley.
  3. Throughout the 1890s, brothers “Jack” and “Gus” built many new types of self-propelled vehicles, such as steam-powered wagons and electric cars. However, the Mack’s had very high standards and dumped their thought-to-be failed attempts into the East River for having too many mechanical flaws.
  4. During WWI, Mack built approximately 4500 model AC trucks for the military. This AC model was the first truck to coin the “Bulldog” nickname. The AC earned its nickname because of its heavy-duty abilities and tenacious bull-nosed look. This nickname eventually led to the legendary Mack “Bulldog” hood ornament that graces the front of every Mack truck to this day.
  5. In 1932, the classic Mack “Bulldog” hood ornament was carved by the company’s chief engineer, Alfred Masury, during his post-op recovery in the hospital. Some say that Masury carved the acclaimed company symbol from soap, while others have rumored he carved it from wood. Masury was unfortunately killed later in 1933, the same year the Bulldog hood ornament began adorning Mack trucks. Additionally, not only does “Bulldog” distinguish Mack trucks with a stylish flair, they also function as a grip for opening the hood of the truck.
  6. During WWII, Mack built approximately 35,000 trucks for the U.S. military. By the end of the war, Mack would supply the military with over $3 million in trucks and other components. As a major military contractor, Mack Trucks ranked 63rd among U.S. corporations in the value of WWII military production contracts.
  7. In 1918, Mack was the first manufacturer ever to fit their trucks with air cleaners and oil filters after engineers learned of the fuel savings and easier maintenance. 4 years later, Mack comes out with another industry first, when they began using a drive shaft instead of a chain drive on their trucks. Additionally, from the late 1920s through the mid 1940s, Mack Trucks offered two styles of trailers, reversible and non-reversible. Over 2600 of these trailers were produced.
  8. Multiple Mack trucks are featured in one of the most iconic trucking films, “Convoy”, including the CruiseLiner and RS700 series. The main character known as, “Rubber Duck”, is generally represented in the film as driving a 1977 Mack RS700 series. This original truck is now on display at the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri.
  9. In the 2006 animated children’s film, “Cars”, a 1985 Mack Superliner serves as the main character, Lightning McQueen’s transport. “Mack” is voiced by John Ratzenberger, who’s father drove a Mack truck to deliver oil for over three decades.
  10. Mack is one of the oldest truck brands in the world, having been around for almost 120 years. Additionally, Mack trucks have been sold in 45 countries around the globe, including Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Venezuela.

                That wraps it up for our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Mack Trucks. Thank you so much for watching! If you liked this video, give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel so you don’t miss out on any of our future videos! If you want to see more content like this, be sure to watch our other episodes of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… located on our channel. If you’d like to learn even more about Mack, check out episode 4 of Truck History on our channel, featuring the entire history of Mack Trucks starting all the way back in 1900.

                  This show is made possible by our online chrome shop, Jack’s Chrome. Head on over to our website www.JacksChromeShop.com and check out our wide variety of headlights, visors, bumpers, fenders, detail products, as well as exclusive Jack’s Chrome Shop posters, merch, and so much more! Save stacks when you shop at Jack’s and use promo code “YOUTUBE” at checkout to save 15% off your order. Don’t forget to tune into our channel on Monday for our podcast highlights and check out the live show on Chrome and Steel Radio YouTube and Facebook at 12pm EST on Wednesdays. Links to the podcast and everything else we mentioned in this video will be in the description. Thanks so much for watching, we’ll see you next week, and remember “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About.. Mack SuperLiner:

https://youtu.be/0XMClzWzAd0

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we have lucky episode #13 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Make way for another Mack attack y’all! On today’s episode we will be covering 10 fun facts about another one of Mack’s many marvelous truck models. Buckle up y’all, because today we are bringing you 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the “superb” SuperLiner.

  1. The heavy-duty Class-8 SuperLiner truck was introduced by Mack in 1977 as a replacement for their Mack RW “Western Mack” model. Although released as a successor to the RW model, the SuperLiner was originally developed as a prototype for the Mack subsidiary, Brockway Motors Company. However, when Brockway Motors shut down in early 1977, the SuperLiner was then unveiled later in the year as a Mack truck instead.
  2. You guys might recall from our previous 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Mack Trucks video, that a 1985 Mack SuperLiner truck infamously plays “Mack” in the 2006 animated children’s movie, “Cars”. However, did you know that the wind deflector featured on “Mack” in the films actually resembles a trucker cap? This universal trucking symbol often worn by real-life truckers not only gives “Mack” that classic trucker look, but also provides the semi with a stylish “visor” similar to the shiny stainless ones found on many show trucks. Speaking of visors… if you’re in the market for Mack parts, visors, and all things stainless, be sure to check out our chrome shop at www.JacksChromeShop.com! 😉
  3. In 1984, Mack introduced the SuperLiner II for the next model year. To further promote these new trucks, Mack built a series of special edition “Magnum” versions of the SuperLiners. These specially built “Magnum” trucks sported a flashy red interior with a sleek black exterior and were only made for one model year with a total of 250 “Magnum” models produced.
  4. A few years later in 1988, Mack Trucks Australia came out with 16 special edition Super-Liner II Bicentennial trucks; all of which were named after highly influential individuals in Australian history. Included in this lineup would be “Ned Kelly” the infamous Australian outlaw and bushranger, (best known for wearing a suit of bulletproof armor during his final shootout with the police) as well as early Australian aviator, Kingsford Smith, better known by his nickname, “Smithy”; among many others.
  5. Speaking of Mack Trucks Australia… Although the original SuperLiners ceased production in the U.S. in 1993, Mack Trucks Australia actually still manufactures the truck as a light-duty version of the Mack Titan.
  6. A 1984 Mack SuperLiner called the “Buckeye Bulldog,” is owned by J.R. Collins Pulling Team and is one of the few trucks to be officially sponsored by Mack. This big, bad bulldog lives up to its “Super”Liner name in the National Tractor Pulling Association in the “Super Semi” class.
  7. Many of you are likely familiar with the cult-classic animated television sitcom, “King of the Hill.” One of main characters, Dale Gribble, is a chain-smoking, paranoid conspiracy-theorist who is rarely seen without his Mack Trucks ball cap. Although Gribble doesn’t make a direct reference to the Mack SuperLiner truck, judging by his consistent Mack attack attire, we think it is safe to assume he is a “super” fan of the “SuperLiner” as well as all other things Mack trucks.
  8. In an early episode of the Nickelodeon animated children’s cartoon series, “Fairly OddParents,” you can spot Nick’s parody version of a Mack SuperLiner truck. This SuperLiner truck features the word “Smack” instead of “Mack” on the grill; a silly play on words as the truck nearly “smacked” the main-character Timmy Turner’s dad when he was a child, as depicted in the episode.
  9. In 2015, Mack Trucks Australia built the world’s most expensive Mack truck ever produced, with their “super-sized” SuperLiner built exclusively for Sultan Ibrahim Ismail of the Malaysian state of Johor. This highly customized, one-of-a-kind rig has an upgraded, jumbo-sized sleeper complete with all the finest fixins’ including eucalyptus wood floors, granite countertops, gold stitching in the upholstery, and 2 large flat screen TV’s complete with a PlayStation and a stereo system. This special SuperLiner was painted red, white and blue to match the Johor state flag, and sports a gold tiger hood ornament in reference to the Sultan’s coat of arms, as opposed to the iconic bulldog hood ornament typically found on all Mack models. Although the exact price of the truck was not revealed, it is thought by many to be upwards of one million dollars.
  10. The made-for-TV movie “Flatbed Annie & Sweetiepie: Lady Truckers;” debuted as the first full-blown trucker chick flick in 1979. As what many would go on to call a cross between “Thelma and Louise” and “Smokey and the Bandit,” “Flatbed Annie & Sweetiepie” starred Annie Potts as Flatbed Annie, Kim Darby as Ginny De LaRosa aka Sweetiepie, and none other than their infamous Mack SuperLiner truck. Throughout the film, these lovely ladies endure all kinds of crazy adventures together on the run from a relentless repo man and two hijacking thugs seeking a secret stash of drugs aboard the SuperLiner. However, with the help of their “super” Mack semi, the pretty pair are able to “keep on truckin’.”

                Thank you so much for watching our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the Mack SuperLiner folks. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We are growing rapidly and quickly approaching our next goal of 20K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show!

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We still have our Truck History shirts available on our website www.JacksChromeShow.com, so be sure to check them out! If you’re in the mood for some chrome, drop by our online chrome shop at JacksChromeShop.com and save on your order by using the discount code “YouTube”. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Mack R Model:

https://youtu.be/misck2q7BEU

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we are back with episode #11 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… This time we are talking about one of Mack’s most marvelous trucks to date, the Mack R Model. Let’s get started!

  1. The Mack R model truck was introduced in 1966 as a replacement for the highly successful Mack B series models. Following in the tradition of its predecessor, the R Model quickly proved itself as one of the worlds most popular heavy-duty diesel trucks and was in production for 40 years.
  2. The first R models introduced were powered by Mack Thermodyne diesel and gasoline engines. However, shortly after the release of the R Model, Mack’s revolutionary Maxidyne diesel engine and Maxitorque transmission debuted, which would go on to be some of Mack’s most notorious engine and transmission, allowing for 5-speeds and lighter weight trucks. The Maxitorque transmission was the first triple countershaft and featured the highest torque capacity in the industry. Additionally, the Maxidyne and Maxitorque were marked on the models they resided in with a gold bulldog hood ornament instead of the typical silver/chrome colored one. However, starting in 2007, a gold bulldog hood ornament took on a new meaning, indicating an all-Mack powertrain within the vehicle.
  3. The film series “Mad Max” has used multiple Mack trucks in their movies. The Mack R-600 oil tanker truck found in the 1981 film, “Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior,” used a “coolpower” engine setup. Another Mack R-600 Model can be found in the 2015 film, “Mad Max: Fury Road,” this time as a wrecker truck.
  4. Speaking of the “Mad Max” Mack R Model truck… The animated adult-cartoon series, “South Park” made a brief spin off of the movie in a Season 8 Episode 3 clip. The truck shown is South Park’s animated version of the Mack R-600 truck, although the truck is rather indistinguishable as far as make and model.
  5. The “U-series” trucks were modifications of the R-series that had a shorter hood and bumper-to-back-of-cab, making them very useful in congested cities. The “U” was basically just a short “R,” however, this shorter length caused the engine “doghouse” to intrude into the passenger footwell. To compensate, the cab was offset slightly to the left; giving it an uneven, unusual look but allowing the driver’s side to remain intact.
  6. In the 1995 film, “Die Hard with a Vengeance;” a Mack R Model truck was involved in a moviemaking mistake where Bruce Willis’ character steals a dump truck originally branded as an Autocar S64U model to transport as asinine amount of gold. However, in a later scene, the Autocar magically transforms into Mack R685ST model.
  7. Many believe the 60s and 70s to be the “golden age” for Mack Trucks, primarily due to the release of the fan-favorite R Model in 1966, arguably Mack’s biggest year ever. The R Model allowed the company to really establish a foothold in the industry and the technologies surrounding this truck would lead Mack to further successes for years to come.
  8. There are numerous songs from all different genres throughout the course of time that make reference to the legendary Mack Trucks. Included in that list would be: Carly Simon “All I Want Is You,” Tupac “Shorty Wanna Be a Thug,” Sheryl Crow “Crash and Burn,” Trace Adkins “Chrome,” Jay-Z and Kanye West “H.A.M.,” and The Grateful Dead “Pride of Cucamonga,” just to name a few. While not all of these songs specifically reference an R Model Mack, the timeframe in which some of them are written combined with the overwhelming popularity of the go-to R Model, cause probable reason to believe at least a few of these songs are likely about everyone’s favorite bulldog, the R model.
  9. In the 1999 Australian Rom-Com, “Paperback Hero,” a Mack R Model truck is used throughout the movie by the main character, truck driver, Jack Willis, portrayed by actor Hugh Jackman. Willis is a hard, tough trucker who ends up writing a bestselling romantic novel, however, embarrassed by its content, he uses his female friends name without her knowledge. Eventually they fall in love and the rest is history, but its not often you find some sweet old iron in a lovey dovey movie such as this one!
  10. The R Model truck was built for all sorts of off-highway heavy-duty jobs. However, many Mack maniacs have said that depending on where your Mack R Model was built, it would change how the truck would be made. For instance, Western Macks were built with a greater variety of lightweight materials and components and would become a RL or RS truck. Whereas Pennsylvania built Macks had more of an unlimited component choice as they were more so in direct competition with other popular brands like Peterbilt, Kenworth and Freightliner. Because of this, Pennsylvania built bulldogs might be more inclined to sport a Maxidyne engine and an all-Mack driveline as perhaps a R685 model.

                Thank you so much for watching our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Mack R Model. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We recently reached our goal of 10,000 subscribers and we’re grateful for all your support for the show! Next stop, 20K subscribers! 😉  

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We just revived our 60 second truck tour series, and you can catch the all-new episode #7 on our channel! Black Friday is right around the corner and we will be releasing shirts for our Truck History and Diesel History on sale for only $15 on JacksChromeShow.com so be sure to check them out on the website. If you’re in the mood for some chrome, drop by our online chrome shop at JacksChromeShop.com and save on your order by using the discount code “YouTube”. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Mack Cabovers:

https://youtu.be/sgYclDxgDIg

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we have episode #18 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… In today’s video we will be covering a couple things you might not know about Mack’s cult-classic cabover engine models. But before we get started, this video was made possible by our online chrome shop, jackschromeshop.com. The all new RoadWorks Exhaust kits for Peterbilt and Kenworth Trucks can be found on the website and come with FREE freight and ship within 48 hours. Save stacks on stacks when you shop with Jack’s Chrome, folks, and remember, “if your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

  1. Mack truly made a name for itself in the 60s when they manufactured a cutting-edge new class of cabover and conventional models in 1962. The first featured in this fresh faced family was the fan-favorite F-model, which debuted an advanced all-steel sleeper and cab configuration. Following its introduction, the F-model family further unfolded to unveil even more iconic models including the renowned R model, the unique U model and the DM model. The F-model featured 5 different diesel engines including Mack’s Thermodyne and Maxidyne engines, as well as Cummins, Caterpillar and Detroit Diesel; and most models were manufactured as set-forward axle trucks, although some set-back axle versions were shipped overseas. Furthermore, the F-series used taper-leaf front springs, which provided a smoother ride.
  2. Speaking of the F-series shipping overseas… the fan-favorite F-model made an appearance in Australia as the modified FR model. Meanwhile, Mack also made a few frame variants in either aluminum or steel versions – denoted by FL and FS designations. As perhaps the most popular and extensive catalogue of cabovers made by the company, the F-series vast range of rigs ran far and wide with over 40 versions of the truck and a total of nearly 60,000 models made.
  3. Before the famed F-models were made, the company had their H-series cabovers which were introduced in 1953 and were dubbed as “Cherry Pickers” because of their high-cab configurations combined with their shortened bumper-to-back-of-cab lengths of only 80 inches. Additionally, these compact cabovers also had a high-tech hydraulic tilt-cab configuration and were the company’s most profit-conscious choice while still providing an increased payload. Another quirk of this rare rig came in the chassis, which was the same classic conventional design debuted on dozens of Mack’s other models; with only the controls and sheet metal changed in the creation of this space-saving semitractor.
  4. Also around this same time, the G-models were introduced in 1959 with the first all-aluminum rivetted cab construction. This all-new aluminum design allowed for a lighter weight with heavier hauling abilities and saw substantial success especially in West Coast applications. The G-series saw a shortened production run due to a combination of their striking similarities to Kenworth’s current cabovers in addition to the company already being ready to begin building the F-models. In fact, a few unconfirmed rumors that Mack hired a designer from Kenworth to help develop the G-series have circulated over the course of time.
  5. In 1975, the company came out with their cult-classic CruiseLiner cabover which came with over 30 engine options and was coined as the “fancier” F-model because of its chrome customizations and interior improvements. Although serving as an icon of innovation for the industry, the CruiseLiner cabovers did come with a couple of complications including a so-called “self-destructing” dashboard, which essentially would end up dragging down into the driver’s lap. Despite these difficulties, the CruiseLiner’s frame was also featured on a few future freight-haulers, including the following fan-favorite SuperLiner semitractor.
  6. Speaking of CruiseLiner cabovers… Although the star of show in the cult-classic trucking movie, “Convoy,” was an R-model Mack, a 1978 Mack CruiseLiner model also makes its appearance in the fan-favorite film, driven by “Pig Pen.” However, many movie maniacs and cabover collectors have accused the cabbie of actually being a Kenworth K100 covered up to come across as a CruiseLiner, which coined the term “CruiseWhopper” for the truck. Some claim you can clearly see where the truck has been reworked; particularly in the paint which was switched to a similar scheme as what would be found on classic CruiseLiners, as well as the modified MACK nameplate above the grill.  
  7. Continuing after the CruiseLiner, the company came out with the UltraLiner truck in 1982 to take over the older and more outdated CruiseLiner cabover. The UltraLiner model featured a fully-fiberglass cab on a reinforced metal frame, 4 different interior trim options, and the choice between round or square headlights. Also similar to the sameness shared between Mack’s classic CruiseLiner and SuperLiner models; the company came out with their second generation SuperLiner II semitractor which saw the utilization of the same UltraLiner chassis.
  8. Also under the UltraLiner umbrella… as far as Class 8 cabovers go, this vehicle was very light in comparison to its competitors and allowed for heavier hauling. However, even after all the love it received following its launch, the UltraLiner would ultimately be the last long-haul cabover the company would continue to create all the way up until 1990. Despite their discontinuation, the UltraLiner cabover continued to remain relatively common all the way up until the mid-to-late 90s; when suddenly these semis and their other cabover counterparts seemingly ceased to exist, mainly due to drastic deregulatory laws launched during this time.
  9. The beloved bulldog emblem has spent nearly 100 years of use as not only an industry icon but the company’s classic hood ornament, but it wasn’t until 1979 that the dog developed a new design with a smoother surface and also adapted an all-new function for the furry freight-haulin’ friends. These pooch ornaments changed operations on conventionals and cabovers, with cabover engine ornaments offering themselves as a stabilizing handle for washing the windshield as well as servicing the wipers.
  10. Unlike most major manufacturers, Mack continues to make cabover models; known as TerraPro trucks. As the amplified demand for cleaner emissions and alternative fuel options emerged, these TerraPro tractors were taken a step further in 2010, when Mack made the announcement that they would now offer an all-new alternative natural gas-powered version of the cabover variant. The cabovers come equipped with a heavy-duty Cummins engine and the ability to utilize either compressed of liquefied natural gas; which pumped up their popularity particularly in the refuse realm, where many municipalities mandate fuel-friendly models as a condition in contracts.

                Thank you so much for watching our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Mack Cabovers. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We have finally reached our goal of 20K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show! Next stop, 50K 😉

                If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our podcast “The Chrome Corner” Wednesday’s at 12PM/NOON EST, and join Dave and Maddie as they answer viewer’s questions and discuss all things chrome! 😉

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We still have our Truck History shirts available on our website, so be sure to check them out! Save stacks on stacks at jackschromeshop.com with the all-new RoadWorks Exhaust kits for Peterbilt and Kenworth Trucks. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”  

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Kenworth W900

https://youtu.be/cLYGo-ZSsr8

                Hey guys its Maddie and today we are back with episode 8 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… On this episode, we are talking about 10 fun facts you probably didn’t know about one of the most iconic trucks EVER… the Kenworth W900. Let’s jump right in!

  1. In continuous production since 1961, the W900 is among the longest-running nameplates in American automotive history with over 50 years on the market. Following the original 900 series previous, the “W” nomenclature in “W900” denotes a set-forward axle.
  2. You might recall from our other Kenworth videos, that the “W” in “W900” is short for “Worthington,” one of the company’s founders. But, did you know that the letters “A” and “B” following the W900A and W900B series trucks, is actually indicative of the generation of the vehicle. The W900 “A” model being the first in the series, followed by the second generation W900 “B” in 1982. However, the subsequent W900 “L” model breaks that pattern in 1990, as the “L” in “W900L” was short for “long hood.” Although we never were able to see the next letter “C” in the W900 series, Kenworth did release what many believe to be the next generation W900 with their W990 in 2018.
  3. In 1991, Kenworth received a unique inquiry from the Seattle Museum of Flight, requesting the transportation of a rare SR71 Blackbird Spy plane that measured over 98 feet long and 23 feet wide. 5 Kenworth trucks were required for the job, including a T800 truck as well as 4 T600A’s. This gigantic oversized load took nearly 2 weeks to transport, and is still to this day the museum’s major attraction.
  4. Kenworth pulled the ultimate power move in 1961 with the release of not only the W900 truck, but also their flagship cabover engine model, the K100. The simultaneous release of this dynamic duo, which had never been done before, only furthered the popularity of the two trucks as the pair fed off of the others success. In fact, the W900 still remains the preferred owner-operator rig of all time. Both the W900 and K100, are highly sought-after by restorers and hold the best resale value in the industry. While the legendary W900 truck is still in production today, its cabover counterpart the K100 series was unfortunately discontinued in 2004, due to a quickly diminishing cabover market.
  5. The W900 is obviously most well-known for its features in films and TV shows throughout time like “License to Kill,” BJ and the Bear,” and “Smokey and the Bandit.” However, a lesser known W9 appearance occurs on the 1985-1986 animated cartoon series, M.A.S.K.. M.A.S.K. not only used a Kenworth W900 in the show but the truck was even a part of the cartoon’s logo.
  6. In 1990, Kenworth released one of their longest truck ever with the W900L. The W900L sports a 130 inch bumper-to-back-of-cab and is one of the longest long-nose models to date. In addition to manufacturing the huge W900L, Kenworth also introduced one of the largest factory-produced sleeper cabs ever in 1998, with the 86 inch studio sleeper.
  7. Speaking of long noses, the newest truck in the W900 lineup, the W990; might not be the W900 replacement, but it does replace the W900 as Kenworth’s longest model. The next generation W990 clips the W900 in length by just 1.5 inches, coming in at a whopping 131.5 inches from bumper-to-back-of-cab.
  8. Although both owned by PACCAR Inc., the Kenworth W900 and Peterbilt 379 rival each other within the trucking community. As by far the 2 most popular models within the show truck circuit, the powerhouse 379 and W900’s are among the most famous, celebrated trucks today. The W900 serves as a commonly chosen basis for show truck customization, with endless options for additional chrome and lights.
  9. The W900 and Kenworth as a whole, have undergone many changes and improvements throughout the years. One of the lesser known differences over the evolution of the W900 as well as other Kenworth’s is on the older models, you will find the KW emblem has 4 stripes, whereas the newer emblems only have 3 stripes. These “stripes” featured on the emblem are also supposed to resemble tire tracks.
  10. Many of you may be familiar with a fairly well-known name within the trucking community as well as the country music world, Mr. Bill Weaver. Bill is not only a fellow host on Chrome and Steel Radio, but also a very talented trucker/musician. In Weaver’s song “Bull-Haulin,” featured on his studio album, “Burnin The Old School Down,” has lyrics that pay homage to the legendary W900 truck. They go a little something like this… “He wipes off his feet and climbs in the seat of a big old W-9…”

                That’s it for our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the Kenworth W900. Thank you so much for watching! If you liked this video, give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel so you don’t miss out on any of our future videos! If you want to see more fun facts about your favorite rigs, be sure to watch our other episodes of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… located on our channel. If you’d like to learn even more about the Kenworth W900 model, check out our very first episode of Truck History, featuring the entire History of the W900. For a plethora of other K-dub content, be sure to watch 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the Kenworth W990, History of the Kenworth K100 Series, as well as the entire History of Kenworth Trucks!

                If you’d like to dive even deeper under the hoods of some of your favorite trucks, check out our newest series, Diesel History on our YouTube channel! We’ve compiled Truck History, Diesel History and our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… series into one convenient place at JacksChromeShow.com. Merch is coming soon for all of our series, so if you’d like to support the channel, head on over to our website and be sure to use promo code YOUTUBE to save 15%!

                This show is made possible by our online chrome shop, Jack’s Chrome. Head on over to our website www.JacksChromeShop.com and check out our wide variety of headlights, steering wheels, grills, fenders, detail products, Jack’s Chrome Shop exclusive apparel, posters and so much more! Save stacks when you shop at Jack’s and use promo code “YOUTUBE” at checkout to save 15% off your order.

                Don’t forget to tune into our channel on Monday for our podcast highlights and check out the live show on Chrome and Steel Radio YouTube and Facebook at 12pm EST on Wednesdays. Links to the podcast and everything else we mentioned in this video will be in the description below. Thanks so much for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember guys, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… Kenworth K100:

https://youtu.be/e3noZ9nvFEk

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we are here with episode #14 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… This time, we’ve got 10 fun facts about the old school but cool classic Kenworth cabover engine model, the K100. Let’s get started!

  1. Since the duos infamous debut in 1961, the K100 and W900 trucks dominated Kenworth’s truck sales for the next 20+ years. In fact, it was these K100 and W900 trucks, or perhaps their simultaneous release that officially established Kenworth as a leader in over-the-road trucks. With the W900 truck still at the top of its game as Kenworth’s leading model to date, some say had it not been for all the changes in length restriction laws, perhaps the K100 truck would’ve gone on to top the conventional W900 model as Kenworth’s most popular truck ever built.
  2. At the K100’s launch, the truck was available in aluminum and in 4 different bumper-to-back-of-cab lengths of 52”, 73”, 76” and 86” inches with more horsepower and transmission options than Kenworth’s competitors at the time; making the K100 truck unlike any other cabover engine trucks on the market.
  3. Despite their discontinuation in the states several years ago, the K-series of cabover engine trucks are still alive and kickin’ in Kenworth’s Australian market, with the most recent K200 truck still in production to this day. In fact, the K-series has undergone more developmental work than any other Kenworth model to compete on the Australian market; with gradual changes made over time based on the original K100 platform. Included in the evolution of the K-series would be K100 truck versions K100C, K100E, and K100G; as well as the K104, K104B and K108 trucks.
  4. Despite bearing few outward physical similarities, the T600 “ant-eater” truck actually began its original development on the company’s flagship cabover model, the K100. Although the T600 model didn’t make its official debut until 1984, the idea for the tractor started out as a response to the 1973 oil crisis, which had taken a brutal toll on both gasoline and diesel prices. In a desperate attempt to further their line of aerodynamically advanced vehicles, Kenworth began work on their new T600 truck starting with none other than their most aerodynamic basis at the time, the K100. In addition the T600 truck, the K100 cabover engine model has also influenced several other aerodynamically styled Kenworth vehicles since its release and continues to do so today as one of the most classic Kenworth trucks of all time.
  5. Over the K100’s lifespan, the truck saw many specialized limited-edition packages, only adding to the truck’s already iconic legacy. Included in this list would be the exceedingly rare “Gold Nugget” limited edition package which sported a unique multicolored metallic paint job, and a specially designed interior with hand-crafted leather upholstery; the patriotic-themed red, white and blue, limited edition “Liberty” package models, as well as the well-known “Very-Important-Trucker,” “VIT,” models and more. These special, limited edition packages continue on today as some of the most sought-after classic trucks to date and are extremely rare and difficult to find.
  6. Over the years, the classic “Matchbox” collector toy car company; have produced a multitude of their own miniature toy versions of the Kenworth K100 truck in various colors and collections. The Kenworth K100 makes various appearances in the “Convoy” and “Super Convoy” collections, with both Aerodyne sleepers and regular sleepers. Although cut down to 1:90 scale, these baby big rig toys still packed a heavy-duty punch and were very detailed to resemble the real-life rigs of which they were designed after.
  7. In 1982, the Surface Transportation Assistance Act was passed and officially ended factoring a tractor’s length into meeting overall length requirements. It was this bill that many blamed for the demise of the K100 truck, as well as the entire cabover engine market as a whole; with a staggering decline in production of the K100 trucks going from more than 7000 trucks produced in 1984 all the way down to fewer than 2000 trucks produced only two years later. Despite today’s laws no longer giving drivers an incentive to use shorter tractors, the K100 cabover engine series maintains a cult-following still to this day.
  8. Kenworth cabover engine trucks, specifically the Kenworth K100 cabovers; were known within the industry for their gigantic engine doghouses. In fact, many drivers would utilize this huge center mound for extra sleeping space as sleeping quarters were limited and the hump was said to be “big enough to sleep on.” However with that being said, Kenworth did briefly experiment with a “Flat-floor” K100 Aerodyne truck. This K100 had a very low grill and featured a “flat-floor” design with the massive engine doghouse hidden under the bunk, allowing for more interior space. Unfortunately, this K-dub was ultimately rejected by dealers and never moved forward into production.
  9. Some of you may recall from our History of the Kenworth K100 series video… That in 1978, a very special Kenworth K100 truck moved the space shuttle, Enterprise, during ground operations in Huntsville, Alabama. However, did you know that the “out-of-this-world” K100 truck was an almost 100-wheeler, coming in with a grand total of 90 wheels.
  10. Many of you within the trucking community might recognize one of the most famous K100 trucks… “Highway Hank” Good’s 1981 Kenworth K100, the “Highway Hilton No.1.” The infamous “Highway Hilton” can be recognized globally by its illuminated initials “HG” on the grill as a mainstay marker in the trucking industry for over 30 years. This special K100 truck has garnered over 120 awards and trophies over its lifespan, in addition to well over 200 magazine and newspaper features and has done multiple tours overseas in Europe; even including a visit to the Berlin Wall in the early 90s. However, in late 2014, this industry icon was donated to the historic Iowa 80 Trucking Museum, where it will finish out its days as monument to a living trucking legend.

 

                Thank you so much for watching our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… the Kenworth K100. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We are growing rapidly and quickly approaching our next goal of 20K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show!                 If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We still have our Truck History shirts available on our website www.JacksChromeShow.com, so be sure to check them out! If you’re in the mood for some chrome, drop by our online chrome shop at JacksChromeShop.com and save on your order by using the discount code “YouTube”. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… International Trucks

https://youtu.be/snWljbGQ4ac

                Hey guys its Maddie and today we are back with episode 7 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… On this episode, we are walking you through 10 facts you probably didn’t know about International Trucks. Test your knowledge of the “Internationally” recognized and respected truck brand, International, in today’s video. Let’s jump right in!

  1. International Trucks parent company, Navistar International Corporation, produces International brand military vehicles through its affiliate Navistar Defense. Navistar Defense is a primary supplier of MRAP armored vehicles such as the International MaxxPro, to the US military. In fact, in 2005, the US army ordered nearly 3000 of Navistar’s 7000-MV trucks for the Afghan National Army and Iraqi Ministry of Defense, with an additional 7000 of these trucks ordered again 3 years later in 2008.
  2. Today, the International truck line is the among the world’s most complete, with 6 separate series of medium, heavy and severe-duty trucks marketed today. The company also has an extensive history of unique, stand-out models over time ranging from the light-duty all-purpose Scout, to the fan-favorite Emeryville cabover engine. Although originally marketed to farmers, International trucks have been wildly successful in various applications worldwide, and are sold “Internationally” in Australia, Brazil, Canada, England, Germany, Mexico, South Africa and more!
  3. For almost 60 years from 1923-1983, International Harvester’s Fort Wayne plant held the highest degree of specialization in heavy-duty truck manufacturing and was unmatched in the industry during its time. Instead of first mass-producing standardized chassis then adapting them to specific applications; International trucks are built “from the ground up” to meet specific hauling requirements. Before production even begins, engineers determine precisely what this vehicles job will be, under what conditions the vehicle will be used, and other variable factors. The truck then is “built on the job.”
  4. Speaking of International’s Fort Wayne Works plant, this old plant is located approximately 45 minutes from all of us here at Jack’s Chrome! Additionally, International’s old truck engine manufacturing plant located in Indianapolis, Indiana, built in 1937, is also about 1 hour away from us here at Jack’s! This engine plant was actually the world’s largest facility devoted exclusively to truck engine manufacturing in its time.
  5. International trucks have earned numerous nicknames such as “Binders,” “Corn Sniffers,” and “Cornqueens,” throughout the years, a nod to the company’s farming roots going all the way back to International Harvester. On a slightly more inappropriate note, some have also given International trucks the naughty nickname of “13 letter sh*t spreaders.”
  6. Since the early 1980s, International and Navistar have both maintained a very close relationship with Ford Motor Company. This relationship started out as supply agreement to provide them with V8 diesel engines for their pickup trucks, but eventually evolved into the production of entire vehicles. All throughout the 1990s and 2000s, Ford offered International/Navistar V8 engines in the Ford Super Duty pickups, which were used up until 2011, when Ford redesigned the Super Duty; fitting it with a new 6.7 Liter V8 engine designed and produced by Ford. Also during this time in the early 2000s, the company’s merged again to create the Ford F-650 and F-750 commercial trucks. However, in 2014, Ford cut International/Navistar out of the business and starting in 2015, began producing the F-650 and F-750 trucks themselves.
  7. One of International’s most popular trucks, the LoneStar, was released in 2008 and can be recognized by its distinctive, cross-hatched grill design and sloped hood. Inspired by International’s early 20th century D-series trucks, the LoneStar combines an old school classic with a modern, aerodynamic twist.
  8. An International TranStar CO-4070 truck can be spotted in the 1984 film, “The Terminator” with the famous, Arnold Schwarzenegger. However, there is some controversy within the trucking community as to whether or not that same TranStar truck is actually the truck that burns in the scenes following, as the burning truck has small round headlights mimicking the older Peterbilt and Kenworth cabover engine models.
  9. Navistar/International has the largest dealer network in North America, as well as one of the largest commercial vehicle parts distribution networks. In fact, Navistar International has a contract with Budget Truck Rental, the second largest consumer truck rental company in the US, to produce their rental trucks.
  10. Nearly 1 in 4 Class 6 through Class 8 trucks on the road today, are International trucks. Additionally, Navistar/International produces over a third of all school buses used in the U.S., and are also the largest diesel engine company in Brazil.

                That wraps it up for our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… International Trucks. Thank you so much for watching! If you liked this video, give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel so you don’t miss out on any of our future videos! If you want to see more content like this, be sure to watch our other episodes of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… located on our channel. If you’d like to learn even more about International, check out episode 5 of Truck History on our channel, featuring the History of International Trucks taking you all the way to their humble beginnings as International Harvester Company.

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About… International Cabovers:

https://youtu.be/44UjMZEzUDk

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we have episode #22 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… In today’s video we will be introducing some interesting fun facts you probably didn’t know about the industry’s iconic International cabover collection. But before we begin, if you’ve enjoyed our videos this far and you’d like to help us continue to create more content, please consider joining our Patreon community by visiting Patreon.com/jackschromeshow. Those of you who become patrons will be treated to a video V.I.P. pass with exclusive early-access to all-new episodes of our brand new Trucking Culture series including the upcoming “Convoy” content we have coming, as well as receive free decals, t-shirts, and truck posters. Interested in becoming part of our Patreon? Please visit the Patreon.com/jackschromeshow link in the description box below and remember folks… “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

  1. Once the Second World War was over, International Harvester would return to its roots of heavy-duty truck manufacturing, after opening up a new-fangled production facility in Emeryville, California in 1947. Following the foundation of their fancy new factory, the company would re-introduce both cab-forward and cabover engine configurations in 1950. The launch of the latter cabover engine model, like many others made during this time; enabled drivers to haul more freight while meeting restrictive length laws, with its tall, narrow cab and rounded hood shape. Additionally, these iconic cabovers came equipped with quite a few firsts, including hinged fenders and a tilting cab, and was offered as the VCO V-8 gasoline engine model and the DCO diesel engine cabover configuration; eventually earning their exclusive “Emeryville” nickname that evolved from the model’s primary production plant to one of the company’s most popular cabover model ever made.
  2. After the introduction of their ever-popular “Emeryville,” International set their sights on something new and a bit strange, as the company saw the all-new SightLiner semitractor appear around 1957. With a similar set-up to Ford’s cramped and confined Crackerbox cabover, the SightLiner semi also sported an extremely short-wheelbase of only 48 inches, or 4 feet. Also, in an effort to allow for advanced visibility, 2 additional windows were added under the windshield and above the grill: giving the SightLiner an extra pair of eyes and also a unique, rather unusual look. Unfortunately, these looks did not launch the SightLiner to success; in fact, many driver’s complained of how easily broken the glass windows were due to rocks and other road debris, as well as the greenhouse effect on sunny days, resulting in severe sunburns if wearing shorts, and would even go as far as to cover up the cabovers lower windows with sheet metal, or simply paint over them. These variables and various others saw a shortened production run of only 5 years for short and sweet SightLiner, before being stopped and shut down completely around 1962.
  3. Moving into the next decade of the 1960s, the emblematic “Emeryville’s” were everywhere – Despite each and every one being constructed in California, International’s iconic “Emeryville’s” were the cult-classic cabovers most commonly seen cruising the streets all across the states. The “Emeryville’s” success saw sales skyrocket, and before long the cabover quickly became “the best-selling truck on American highways for 4 consecutive years.” International made not only an incredible influence on the entire industry with their eye-catching “Emeryville,” but also impacted the now iconic Cali-city of Emeryville, which ironically is now home to another colossal company called Pixar, who created the all-time favorite animated freight-haulin’ film, “Cars.”
  4. Subsequent to the soaring success of their exclusive “Emeryville” in the early 60’s; International introduced their CO-4000 cabover in 1965 debuting as their first heavy-duty cabover highway tractor designed completely by the company, and replaced the golden generation of tilt-cab “Emeryville” tractor, derived from a Diamond T design. The CO-4000 launched with a larger and wider cab, and came equipped with a gigantic trapezoidal grill that would go on to used on countless International cabovers up into the late 1990’s. Unfortunately, this particular cabover was only produced for 4 years before undergoing an update that would ultimately transform into the traditional TranStar truck.
  5. The transformative TranStar tractor took over in 1968 and although it included an International turbocharged V-8 gasoline engine standard – debuted with a design intended to accommodate larger-displacement diesel engines like Detroit and Cummins. The model was also mainly marketed as the TranStar truck, despite being internally known at International as the CO/COF-4070A and the CO/COF-4090A raised roof cab. The next year in 1969, the TranStar cabover truck series took things a step further when they came out with their TranStar 400 conventional cab, featuring the same cab fitted on the “Emeryville” model; and the year after that in 1970, saw the Super TranStar debut with a Detroit Diesel 12V71 V12 engine, allowing for loads of up to 144,000 lbs., as well as the unique, all-wheel-drive UniStar model fitted with a freewheeling front axle.
  6. Also in 1970, the company came out with their medium-duty series of CargoStar forward-control cabovers, and, although primarily produced in conventional configurations, replaced the LoadStar cabover collection. The CargoStar cabover came equipped with an improved cab and maneuverability, and also had a huge selection of much heavier models in both gasoline and diesel variants, making the larger CargoStar cabovers loved as local semi-tractors and the smaller, shorter-wheelbased CargoStars useful as straight trucks in cramped cities.
  7. Travelling back in time to the TranStar truck series… A second generation TranStar II tractor was turned out in 1974, also known as the CO/COF-4070B. Visually, this new variant of the TranStar truck was virtually unchanged, although TranStar II vehicles can typically be distinguished by their top-cab-mounted windshield wipers. Continuing on under the cab, the TranStar II truck also accommodated trends leaning towards even larger-displacement engines; including International’s own V800 turbocharged diesel V-8, and the largest engine ever fitted to a roadgoing vehicle, with the Cummins KT-450, among others.
  8. The time came to retire the tried and true TranStar cabover trucks in 1981, and in came International’s CO-9670 cabover, the first of the all-new Newport Series Cabovers, also known as the XL-series or the “Eagle.” This so-called XL-Eagle earned its large and in charge nickname due to its widened cab with larger doors and a larger windshield for better visibility, but ironically was intended for smaller-displacement diesel engines. In addition to sharing a strikingly similar trapezoid-shaped grill as the TranStar cabover truck, the 9670 also saw use of the same doors debuted on the TranStar 4300 conventional configuration. Perhaps the most desirable feature found on the 9670 is in the impeccable interior, designed without any intrusion of the engine into the cab, allowing for the first flat-floor to ever be marketed.
  9. In 1988, Navistar rebranded and redesigned the Newport Series, with the release of the new 9700/9800 models and the renaming of the CO-9670 to the 9600. The addition of these all-new 9700/9800’s allowed for set-back front axle version to be adopted, and also accommodated many aerodynamic advancements including lower body skirting, a fancier front bumper, and faired-in front turn signals. These second generation 9000 series cabbies also came with the same famed flat-floor design, allowing for walk-in access to the sleeper, which would later be made more famous after featuring on Freightliner’s Argosy model in 1999.
  10. Unfortunately, these classic 9000-series cabovers were discontinued in 1998 in the North American market – However, Navistar still noticed a need for continued cabover production outside of the states, and subsequently started exporting new 3rd generation 9800i trucks to South America, with exclusive right-hand drive options also exported to Australia and South Africa. Additionally, it was said that some tooling for the 9800i was sent to Brazil for production purposes. In 2015, the 9800i cabover was cut from production, although, as of August 2017, the truck was still being sold in South Africa.

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