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Bill Weaver – Trucking Culture Episode 6:

Intro:

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we are super excited to show you guys the next episode of our Trucking Culture series, which covers all kinds of music, movies, and other media that have made a major impact on the trucking industry. In today’s episode #6, we will be weaving through the history of a trucker turned musician that is very near and dear to our hearts, Mr. Bill Weaver.

                But before we begin, we sincerely hope you’ve enjoyed our Trucking Culture series so far, and we’d like to thank you all so much for making it as successful as it is. Although in the past we have put the series behind our Patreon wall and eventually on our Jack’s Chrome Shop YouTube channel – for future episodes of the series such as this one, we will be transferring Trucking Culture to our sister channel, Chrome and Steel Radio YouTube, where we will be bringing you 2 times the amount of Trucking Culture with not just 1, but 2 episodes each month. If you wanna continue to watch even more episodes of Trucking Culture, be sure to like this video and subscribe to Chrome and Steel Radio YouTube channel using the link in the description box below, so you can stay caught up on all things Chrome.

Body:

                William Earl Weaver was born into a military family on July 28th, 1967, at General Wainwright Hospital in Fairbanks, Alaska, to Melvin and Katie Weaver. Bill was one of 4 children, including 2 older brothers, Randy, and Ronnie, and 1 sister named Susan. Despite the fact Bill and his family lived all across the United States for the first 10 years of his life, he lived a happy childhood full of constant change and fun new adventures awaiting him around every corner. Although Bill was seemingly born for life on the road, with a wandering heart and a gypsy soul, eventually, he and his family wound up in a small city in Arkansas called Cotter, only approximately 6 miles from where Weaver currently calls his home in Flippin, Arkansas.

                Bill enjoyed music from an early age and began writing his own original songs when he was just an elementary student, after being bought his first guitar at the age of 5 by his father and grandfather. Among Bill’s biggest influences musically speaking – are greats like Buddy Holly, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash, and Roger Miller – who were all incredibly talented singer-songwriters and guitar players that still inspire and serve as great heroes and favorites of his today. In fact, when Bill isn’t busy singing and writing songs of his own, you can often catch him jamming just about anything from the late 60’s by Haggard or Jennings.

                Speaking of heroes… some of Bill’s other greatest influences growing up were his uncles, Walter Newton, and Marvin Weaver, who were both truck drivers and “infected him” with the so-called trucking virus at a young age. Growing up, Weaver loved watching the old school trucking tv series “Movin’ On,” which is where he first found his favorite truck of all time, the cool, classic Kenworth W-9. Bill was always amazed by his uncle’s beautiful big rigs – always driving something shiny and noisy – with the latest and greatest, most up to date accoutrements a truck could possibly have and taking great pride in driving it.

                Not only was Bill impressed by the looks of their trucks, but by his uncle’s incredible ability to “back a truck in on top of a dime and still have room to get out of it and chew your rear while keeping you laughing for not doing it right the first time.” By the age of 14, one of Bill’s biggest heroes, his dear Uncle Marvin, taught him how to drive a truck and “crawled up his rear more than once about how to stay alive, and how to die, hauling a hazmat load.”

                Bill graduated from Cotter High School in Arkansas in 1985. Straight out of high school from 1985-1989, Bill served in the United States Army, where he was stationed in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, as well as across seas in Germany and other parts of Europe. After serving a short stint in the army for 4 years, Bill became a cop at the County Sheriff’s Department, where he worked for several years in law enforcement with Marion County and Flippin, Arkansas police department up until 2007. While serving as a sheriff, Bill still continued to drive trucks on the side part-time.

                From 2007 forward, Bill began driving full-time – despite consistently driving trucks for the majority of his adult life. Also around this time, Bill began singing, playing guitar, and writing his own original songs while out on the road. According to Bill, most of his writing starts simply with the idea for a melody, and slowly but surely while driving, Bill begins putting together the words piece by piece, with lyrics stemming from feelings, thoughts and things seen and heard while over the road. Throughout both his military and law enforcement careers, Bill would earn numerous awards and accolades of all kinds, eventually earning a few awards for songwriting from several different writers’ organizations as well.

                Moving through the late 2000’s and early 2010’s, Bill slowly started to settle down and on November 12th, 2013, Bill married the love of his life, Mrs. CarolAnn Weaver, who he credits as the one who “keeps its all working at home, all while keeping him in the mental place he needs to be in order to do his music and to keep on truckin’.” Bill and his wife, CarolAnn, have 3 children between them, all of which currently reside in Arkansas, including their eldest son, Robert, who is 31, their daughter Kelsey, who is 29, and lastly their youngest daughter Lesley, who is 26. Both of Bill’s older brothers also live locally in Arkansas, with his sister, Susan, making her home in the same city in which Bill was born, Fairbanks, Alaska, where she works as a nurse.

                Speaking of the wonderful Miss CarolAnn Weaver… it was her who really encouraged and supported Bill’s dreams of singing and songwriting behind the scenes, and eventually helped Bill begin his own original brand, Bill Weaver Music. In fact, on rare occasions, you can even catch Bill’s beautiful wife belting out a few notes by Bill’s side or singing back-up vocals. A few years later in 2016, Bill released his debut record, “Every Mile I Drive,” which featured quite a few of Weaver’s biggest hits including “The Diesel Life,” “Mr. D.O.T.,” and “That’s Why He Trucks,” which according to Bill, is his all-time favorite original song of his and is 100% written about his beautiful wife, CarolAnn.

                Only 2 short years after his wildly successful debut album dropped, Weaver would release his second studio album, “Burnin’ the Old School Down,” in August of 2018. “Burnin’ the Old School Down” featured the self-entitled track, as well as his song “Tough Tested,” which teamed together with the well-known big rig brand, and last but certainly not least, the fan-favorite freight-haulin’ song, “Bullhaulin’,” which is perhaps Bill’s most beloved song, with nearly 1 million music video views on YouTube alone, and tens of thousands of streams among all other platforms.

                Bill’s presence in the trucking industry, combined with his country music career, have seen soaring success for his songs, with almost 15,000 monthly listeners on Spotify, more than 5,500 YouTube subscribers, and over 7,500 likes on Facebook. Bill also works with many of the bigger brands within the trucking industry, including our very own Chrome and Steel Radio, Tough Tested, Road Pro Family of Brands, Henniff Transportation, TruckerPath, and more, who have sponsored several of his videos and helped him out along the way. Bill’s most recent single release, “The Truckers Path,” although originally written over 6 years ago, is Weaver’s latest work in conjunction with the big trucking brand, TruckerPath, and so far has seen soaring success since its debut at the beginning of September this year.

                Moving forward, Bill intends to remain out on the road and trucking for at least 10 more years, with goals of growing a fleet of approximately 10 to 12 trucks by the time he retires. Weaver also wishes to continue singing and songwriting any and everywhere that he can – as it is and has always been one of his true passions in life. When Mr. Bill Weaver isn’t busy being a big trucking music star, you can often catch him doing all kinds of countless outdoor activities with his wife CarolAnn, including stump removal, 😉 spending quality time with friends, family, and fellow freight-haulers, or enjoying a cold Busch light. 😉

                Although Bill has already made quite a big name for himself throughout the trucking and music industries, we have a feeling this dream- “Weaver” is nowhere near done debuting tunes for the “truck driving women and men” out there on the road and living that “diesel life!” So stay tuned on this “Trucker’s Path” for more beautiful music by Bill Weaver to come and don’t forget driver’s, “We Drive On!”

Outro:

                Thank you so much for watching our all-new Trucking Culture series featuring Bill Weaver. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe as we continue to grow our Chrome and Steel Radio YouTube account. We are already at a little over 140 subscribers, and our goal is to hit 200 by the end of the month on Halloween… so thank you all so much for your continued support for our channel!

                If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our other shows including A Daily Dose of Hope with your favorite yogi, Ms. Hope Zvara, Bullhaulin’ BS with crazy cowhaulers Jerry Novak and his son Tyler, The Chrome Corner with host Dave Coleman, and last but certainly not least… the Out on the Road show with our very own, Bill Weaver. If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, please follow us at @chromeandsteelradio on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Be sure to stop by the site and search through our selection of Chrome and Steel Radio shirts available in a wide range of sizes spanning from small to 5XL! Thanks for watching, we will see you next time on Chrome and Steel.

Trucks of War: World War II:

Intro:

                Hey guys it’s Maddie! Today we are here with yet another brand-new series for you folks, Trucks of War. In this series, we will be guiding you through the guts and gore of the wartime warriors that helped drive the U.S. military and mold the modern-day model of truck manufacturing. Starting us off is the biggest, baddest, bloodiest war of all… World War II. Let’s jump right in!

Body:

                From late 1939 through the end of 1945, the world was in a very volatile place as it experienced a war like never before. Spanning over the course of 6 years and 6 continents, the savage slaughter of Second World War was one of the most serious struggles the U.S. has ever suffered. In order to sustain the safety of our nation, our military service stood in need of some serious support – which would come in the form of various heavy-duty vehicles and tactical trucks.

                During the early years of the war, the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps had started developing a complete line of rugged rigs that could operate off-road in all types of weather. However, due to the extenuating wartime circumstances, the Ordnance Corps needed all the help they could get in expediting their processes and encouraged many manufacturers during the time to join in the making of military materials.

                Many of these new models and materials manifested in 1941, including a multitude of military-grade 4x4 and 6x6 trucks in tons of different tonnages. Although we obviously will be unable to cover each and every make and model, we have compiled a cohesive catalog including quite a few of the most cherished, cult-classic combat vehicles from the quintessential American conflict, World War II.

                Perhaps most notable of all – World War II saw the creation of one of America’s most valued vehicles, the “Jeep.” Despite now being primarily produced for consumer use; the Jeep was once a beloved lightweight, military workhorse modelled to move troops and much more. This ¼ ton 4x4 truck travelled tough terrain with ease and quickly became the leading light wheeled transport vehicle of the U.S. military with President Eisenhower later referring to them as, “one of three decisive weapons the U.S. had during WWII…”

                Due to the overwhelming success of the “Jeep,” the U.S. military encouraged both Willy’s Overland Motors and Ford Motors Company to build the models for them. These wagons were known as the Willy’s MB “Quad” and the Ford GPW “Pygmy,” and served as the world’s first mass-produced 4-wheel-drive car. Speaking of mass production – a grand total of nearly 650,000 of these so-called “Jeeps” were built; with the more popular Willy’s wagon constituting well over half of the weight with almost 360,000 units.

                Although acclaimed as the almighty alpha truck for the armed forces, prior to the jaw-dropping Jeeps – Dodge developed their first all-military designed truck with their ½ ton WC series models which made its debut as the U.S. Army’s first standard light truck. This WC model line was also extended into ¾ and 1 ½ ton trucks, with Dodge serving as the Army’s sole producer of ¾ ton trucks throughout the entirety of the war. A total of over 255,000 of these WC series trucks were built across all variants including weapons carriers, ambulances, and radio command reconnaissance vehicles.

                GMC also played a paramount part in the Second World War as a primary provider of 2 ½ ton 6x6 trucks with none other than their celebrated CCKW cargo carrier. Of the almost 2.5 million total trucks bought by the U.S. military during the second World War; over 1/3 of them were 2 ½ ton models – with more than 70% of those being built by GMC as some version of the CCKW. These “Jimmy Deuce and a Half” trucks came in several variants including an open or closed cab, long or short wheelbase, and even in a unique, amphibious option as the DUKW.

                The DUKW, better known as the “Duck,” was modelled after its cousin CCKW truck, with the addition of a watertight hull and a propeller. The “Duck” added to its versatility as an amphibious vehicle by also being the first truck to allow the driver to vary the tire pressure from inside the cab – which would prove exceedingly beneficial for both hard surfaces such as roads, as well as softer surfaces like sand.

                This ability to instantly adapt tires would serve the military well during the D-day invasion on the beaches of Normandy. Additionally, all of these standardized, heavy service GMC cargo haulers would go on to form the backbone of the famed “Red Ball Express” convoy system that supplied Allied forces moving quickly through Europe after the events of D-Day.

                 GMC’s sister company, Chevrolet, also manufactured many models for the U.S. military and its allies. Most popularly, the 1 ½ ton 4x4 G506 trucks also known as the Chevy G4100 and G7100 models, were produced in mass quantities and eventually became the standard 1 ½ ton 4x4 trucks for the U.S. Army. However, several of these trucks were shipped over seas to supply the Soviet Union as part of the Lend-Lease program.

                This Lend-Lease program also saw large numbers of the Studebaker US6 2 ½ ton 6x6 trucks supplied to the Soviets. A total of roughly 220,000 trucks in 13 variations were built, and they became affectionately referred to as the “Studer” by Soviet troops. These “Studers” were even specially recognized for their superb service in the Soviet war efforts by none other than Joseph Stalin himself, who went as far as to send a personal letter of appreciation to Studebaker.

                Strikingly similar to the sensationalized Studebaker semis, were the identically built REO US6’s which came without the front-mounted winch and were more specifically referred to as US6 U9 models. Both Studebaker and REO US6 models were renowned for its overall ruggedness and reliability, as well as their unprecedented ability to run on even the poorest-quality fuel.

                 Also during this time, a new family of heavy-duty 6-ton 6x6 tactical, all-terrain trucks were assembled by an assortment of manufacturers in 7 different body types. Perhaps the most prominent of these would be the Brockway B666, with almost 220,000 built. Mack also had their noteworthy “NM” 6-ton 6x6 Prime Mover Cargo truck, which was Mack’s first military 6x6 model. In addition to their 6-ton 6x6 “NM” models, Mack also built the bigger and badder 7 ½ ton 6x6 “NO” Prime Mover Cargo truck. The Mack “NO” model was built in 7 variants throughout its production but was largely used as either an artillery tractor or a salvage vehicle. 

                Additionally, there were a couple company’s creating slightly smaller 4-ton 6x6 trucks – with Diamond T’s Model 968 being the most popular with over 30,000 produced. Autocar’s Model U8144T was also developed for and primarily deployed by the U.S. Army as the largest, most heavy-duty 4x4 trucks in World War II. These cabover engine designed models were built in 5- to 6-ton capacities and became the Army’s standard “ponton tractor” specialized for towing bridging equipment. These models were also built by White Motors Company as the Model 444T, who would later go on to purchase the entire Autocar brand.

                 10-ton 6x6 Heavy Wrecking M1 trucks were made by manufacturers Kenworth and Ward LaFrance Truck Corp – who in total contracted a total of close to 5800 of these big rigs. In addition to their wrecker body style, all M1 trucks came equipped with a 20,000 lb. front winch, a rear winch, heavier bumpers, and a big front tow-bar which allowed the M1’s to recover and move lighter vehicles with ease.

                Titanic tractors called “Tank Transporters” were built as some of the biggest, baddest trucks in both 6x4 and 6x6 12-ton capacities. The Diamond T Model 980 and the Pacific M26 “Dragon Wagon” were among two of the toughest 12-ton tractors of the time and proved capable in the transport of even the most tasking tanks in the service.

                Despite the muscle of the massive M26, it simply could not muster the might of the 70-ton T29 and 95-ton T28 tanks. So speaking of super strong semis, Sterling Trucks took this strength a step further with their 8x8 12-ton T26 truck. Designed to take over for Pacific’s powerful “Dragon Wagon,” this 8-man cargo cab forward saw little action as the war ended before they could be shipped to Europe.

                As the Second World War officially came to a close in September of 1945, the production of the above-mentioned military models also concluded. Regardless of the retirement of these rigorous rides, the rugged reputation of these rigs still remains as a relic of our nation’s roots. Additionally, these fierce, fighting freight-haulers would pave the way for further advancements in truck technology that would continue to benefit our nation to this day.

Outro:

                Thank you all so much for watching our brand-new Trucks of War series featuring the trucks of World War II. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We are growing rapidly and quickly approaching our next goal of 20K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show!

                If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our live podcast “The Chrome Corner” Wednesday’s at 12PM/NOON EST, and join Dave and Maddie as they answer viewer’s questions and discuss all things chrome! 😉

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We still have our Truck History shirts available on our website www.JacksChromeShow.com, so be sure to check them out! If you’re in the mood for some chrome, drop by our online chrome shop at JacksChromeShop.com and save on your order by using the discount code “YouTube”. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!” 

 

Trucks of War – World War I:

Intro:

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we are back with our last brand new episode of Trucks of War. Continuing on after our Trucks of the Afghan & Iraqi War video, today we are finishing off the Trucks of War series with our final episode featuring the first major war with Trucks of World War I. But before we get started, this video was made possible by our online chrome shop, jackschromeshop.com. Be sure to stop the site and sweep through our selection of sales including $100 off blind mount bumpers, $50 off billet pedals, and a special steering wheel deal… when you purchase a Steering Creations wheel, you get ½ off your hub kit! So go grab yourself some Chrome for your Home and remember folks… “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Body:

                Exactly one month from the day Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Bosnia – World War I began on July 28th, 1914 as a great global war that was at the time described as the so-called “war to end all wars.” This First World War led to the mobilization of more than 70 million military personnel – making it one of the largest wars in history. Unfortunately, World War I also marked one of the most deadly conflicts to ever occur, with an estimated 9 million military combatant deaths and approximately 13 million civilian deaths due directly to the war – while resulting genocides and influenza pandemics caused anywhere from another 17 to 100 million more deaths worldwide.

                Despite President Woodrow Wilson’s best efforts to keep the United States out of the dreaded world war – finally after almost 3 years and a subsequent attack and sinking of several American ships – on April 6th, 1917, the Americans officially entered World War I. Although America had already been supplying many war materials to allies, trained American forces did not begin arriving at the fore-front of the fight until mid-1918. Trucks also took off towards the latter part of the war, despite their existence prior, starting with the first official standardized military model ever, the Class-B Liberty Truck.

                The Liberty truck was designed and developed by the Motor Transport sector of the Quartermaster Corps with some help from the Society of Automotive Engineers in 1917. Following the 1st 2 successful prototypes only 69 days after its original development, the design was finalized by mid-1917 and put into production beginning in January of 1918. Parts were produced by 150 different manufacturers, engines were created as a collaboration of 5 companies including Buda, Hercules, Continental, Waukesha and Wisconsin, and assembly contracts were awarded to 15 select companies who built approximately 10,000 of the trucks all together.

                Class-B Liberty trucks were being built all across the country by companies like Gramm-Bernstein, Bethlehem, Brockway, Diamond T, Indiana, Packard, Pierce-Arrow, Republic, Sterling, and several others – who all came together in an effort to create a truck built to help standardize the parts catalogue and utilize the best, most heavy-duty truck technologies available at the time. On the lighter side of things… a more minor truck model was made, known as the Dodge M1918 light repair truck, which was a small open steel cab pick-up truck used to carry tools for trucks in need of emergency repairs. Despite the fact that the model was mounted on a Dodge commercial car chassis, this Dodge truck was built by a company called Insley Manufacturing and contained many specialized chests and other compartments made to carry supplies.

                Dodge wasn’t the only American car manufacturing making materials and truck models for World War I – Ford also helped during this time in the design of one of the first tanks developed by the U.S., a 3-ton, 2-man, 1-gun M1918 tank truck, built on the basis of the Renault FT and equipped with the exact same engine seen on Ford’s famous Model T truck. Although initially taking an isolationist point of view and not involving themselves with what they considered to be “an entirely European war,” eventually Ford went on to supply more than 15,000 Model T military vehicle variants moving from mid-1917 forward.

                The United States Army also ordered around 15,000 3-ton “Model B” trucks, created by a company called Four Wheel Drive Auto, who produced some of the first successful four wheel drive military models. These FWD Model B trucks were also produced under license by companies including Peerless Motors, Kissel Motor Car Company, Premier Motor Corp., and Mitchell Motor Car Company. In addition to these FWD trucks, another four wheel drive design known for its durability – the “Jeffery Quad” or the “Nash Quad” – was introduced into the line of military models. These rugged, reliable rigs were built by both Jeffery and Nash Motors and were renowned for their ability to navigate rough roads and served as rather effective workhorses during World War I.

                The well-known White Motors Company of Cleveland, Ohio, built an armored car called the White No.1 4x2 in 1915, which was followed by the White No.2 4x2 the next year in 1916. The White No.2 armored truck was adopted by the U.S. Army and the U.S. Marines, which was then utilized in World War I, and eventually evolved into the White Model 1917, which was developed in part by the American Expeditionary Force or AEF. The following model White AEF was also designed by the force, who used the vehicle in 1918 on the Western Front towards the end of World War I. Another armored car, called the Davidson Cadillac armored car, was using sporadically throughout the First World War.

                The First World War was finally over following a ceasefire and armistice declared on November 11th, 1918, and it proved a pivotal point in the political, cultural, economic, and social climate of the entire world. In addition to moving the whole world forward with more trucks and manufacturing technologies, WWI also sparked a series of treaties to be signed by the Big 4 (Britain, France, Italy and the U.S.) at the 1919 Paris Peace Conference, including the very well known Treaty of Versailles that officially brought the war to its end and promoted peace between Germany and the Allied Powers.

                Despite a conclusive Allied victory and the launch of the League of Nations, intended to prevent future wars – World War I definitely did not live up to its “war to end all wars” declaration with many more wars to follow including the Second World War several years later on starting in September of 1939. Lots of lessons were learned both mechanically and strategically speaking during this time, with huge strides made in trucks and their manufacturing that eventually led to the evolution of even more makes and models to be made in the future.

Outro:

                Thank you all so much for watching our last and latest Trucks of World War I video. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We have finally reached our goal of 30K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show! Next stop, 50K 😉 If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our live podcast “The Chrome Corner” Wednesday’s at 12PM/NOON EST, and discuss all things chrome with our host Dave Coleman! 😉 If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Be sure to buy your big rig the best Chrome for your Home with some sweet stainless sales on our website at jackschromeshop.com. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Trucks of War: Vietnam War:

Intro:

                Hey guys it’s Maddie! It’s been a little bit but today we are back with our brand new Trucks of Wars series. In this series, we will be guiding you through the guts and gore of the wartime warriors that helped drive the U.S. military and mold the modern-day model of truck manufacturing. Continuing on after our Trucks of the Korean War video, today we are kicking it off with Trucks of the Vietnam War. But before we get started, this video was made possible by our online chrome shop, jackschromeshop.com. Be sure to stop by the site and sweep through our selection of sales including sweet new billet pedals for 15% off and remember folks… “if your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Body:

                Only 2 short years after the Korean War conflict came to an end, the Vietnam War began between the North and South countries in November of 1955 and would wage on for the next 2 decades totaling almost 20 years of destruction. Continuing quickly on the curtails of the Korean conflict, there was of course, similarly to World War II and the Korean War, quite a bit of crossover when it came to which war-time workhorses were used as so-called “wagon warriors” in the war with Vietnam.

                One of the most major models, the M35, was originally offered by REO as early as 1949, but has served in several subsequent war since and still the vehicle and its various variants were again utilized during the Vietnam war. Of course, also throughout the war with Vietnam, Jeeps were further justified as first-class carriers of cargo, trustworthy troop transporters, and much more.

                However, the M38 Jeep models proved to provide pretty poor passenger protection, and as we mentioned at the end of our Trucks of the Korean War video; after the conflict in Korea was over, a lot of all-new and advanced Armored Personnel Carriers or APCs and Infantry Fighting Vehicles or IFVs were introduced. After lots of research on more logistically-minded cargo-hauling models, the brand-new Ford-built M151 MUTT was made for use as an all-new military vehicle for Vietnam in 1959.

                2 years later in 1961, another APC was adopted into the U.S. Army’s lineup, this time a fully-tracked, aluminum-hulled, M113 model. Intended to be amphibious and air transportable, the M113 was considerably lighter than its preceeding M59 model but lacked the “get-up-and-go” due to its gasoline-powered-engine. Because of this, in April of 1963, another diesel-powered design debuted, called the M113A. This M113A1 model was made for a 2-man crew of 1 commander/gunner and 1 driver, as well as 11 soldiers, and eventually took over as the main M113 model used by the military in Vietnam.

                The main mission of the U.S. military during the war was to move supplies from coastal ports to inland bases, largely through cargo-carrying convoys of sometimes up to 200+ trucks. With that being said, these long truck lineups with little to no security, made tempting targets for Viet Cong guerrilla groups, which gave birth to an area known as “Ambush Alley,” where trucks and troops were terrorized by North Vietnamese Army tactics.

                Although military police units provided minimal security, they simply could not produce the manpower needed to patrol the whole highway, thus heading up the heavier duty “hardened convoy” concept and coining the term “gun trucks.” After a slew of ambush attacks occurred on armored Jeeps, proving them inadequate in the face of improved Viet Cong weaponry, these new generation of “gun trucks” were made into more modified machinery carefully crafted by the soldiers themselves, using many previously produced military makes and models. 

                Mostly based on the main 2 ½-ton M35 truck model made by GMC, these “gun trucks” were originally armed with 2 M60 machine guns protected by a sandbag barrier and were built by soldiers to saturate the attackers with firepower during the first few minutes of the fight. When the sandbags would start to get waterlogged however, it would weigh down the whole vehicle, and eventually steel plating started being salvaged from scrap yards for both safety and speed purposes.

                Despite the increased security, transportation units still came under attack, forcing the gun truck units to improve the design of their vehicles. The two-and-a-half-ton trucks were underpowered, and the addition of armor and weapons slowed them down, leading to their replacement by five-ton cargo trucks that formed the basis for larger gun trucks. The improvised nature of these new gunners meant these vehicles varied considerably in appearance and were often given colorful, creative nicknames that were then hand-painted on the sides in large lettering.

                Although given rather aggressive alias’, gun trucks were strictly defensive weapons, which were used exclusively for convoy escorts and perimeter defense duties. In all, an estimated 3-to-4-hundred trucks were transformed this way, despite originally serving as a temporary solution until enough V-100 armored cars could be shipped. Despite debuting in June of 1962, the V-100 or so-called “Cadillac Gage Commando” cars weren’t deployed to Vietnam until September of 1963, and due to extreme demand, these armored cars were allocated quickly. However, the V-100 vehicles were said to be a dangerous death trap if penetrated and also proved problematic due to its poor powertrain, allowing “gun trucks” to triumph and continue to serve until the end of the war.   

                The great “Gamma Goat” graced the battlefield in 1969, formally designated as the M561 6x6 tactical truck built by Roger Gamount and the Consolidated Diesel Electric Company or “CONDEC” of North Carolina, which debuted and quickly earned its nickname by capturing the amazing climbing abilities of a wild goat. A medically-minded transport-vehicle variant was also developed, designated as the M792, and a variety of over 15,000 of these total trucks were pumped out of production in only 4 short years before being completely cancelled in 1973.  

                The fight finally ended formally in April of 1973, as the U.S. forces withdrew after almost 20 years and an agreement between the Vietnam’s was adopted unifying the countries under Communist control in 1975. Also around this same time, despite the demise of the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army began drafting designs for High Mobility Combat Vehicles or HMCVs, to take over for the well-loved light-weight Jeep wagon which had been being used for years. These High Mobility Combat Vehicles eventually paved the way for what would become the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle or HMMWV, also known as the historic “Humvee” models that would take over as the top tactical military truck moving forward.

Outro:

                Thank you all so much for watching our brand-new Trucks of War series featuring the trucks of the Vietnam War. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We have finally reached our goal of 20K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show! Next stop, 50K 😉

            If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our podcast “The Chrome Corner” Wednesday’s at 12PM/NOON EST, and join Dave and Maddie as they answer viewer’s questions and discuss all things chrome! 😉

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Be sure to buy your big rig the best Chrome for your Home with some beautiful brand new billet pedals for 15% on our website at jackschromeshop.com. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!” 

Trucks of War: Korean War:

 

Intro:

                Hey guys it’s Maddie! It’s been a little bit but today we are back with our brand new Trucks of Wars series. In this series, we will be guiding you through the guts and gore of the wartime warriors that helped drive the U.S. military and mold the modern-day model of truck manufacturing. Continuing on after our Trucks of World War II video, today we are kicking it off with Trucks of the Korean War. But before we keep going, this video was made possible by our online chrome shop, jackschromeshop.com. The all new RoadWorks Exhaust kits for Peterbilt and Kenworth Trucks can be found on the website and come with FREE freight and ship within 48 hours. Save stacks on stacks when you shop with Jack’s Chrome, folks, and remember, “if your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Body:

                Trailing on the tail end of the Second World War era; the Korean War came along approximately 5 years after in June of 1950 and was caused by North Korea crossing the 38th parallel and conquering its southern neighbor, the Republic of Korea, and unifying the two together under a single communism command. This left the Republic of Korea in ruins and led President Harry Truman’s decision to rally our troops up to reinforce and re-establish the Republic of Korea.

                Continuing on the curtails of World War II, there was quite a bit of crossover between the vehicles used in the following fight against Korea. Additionally, a lot of all-new aerial attacks were put into action with this war and more advanced aircraft played a central role in combat, with the new-generation of jet-powered fighters arriving in the theater.

                With that being said, during this time, dozens of durable, “deuce and a half” trucks were still widely available to aid in war efforts, thanks to the mass manufacturing of many military models. Despite their undoubted dependability as wartime workhorses, this new war would need new warrior wagons as well. In 1951, GMC granted those wishes when they replaced their cult-classic CCKW and M135 utility trucks with the M35 models. These M35’s took the 2 1/2 -ton cargo truck torch and went on to forge its own fame as a fan-favorite cargo carrier, troop transporter, guided-missile launcher and more. Produced by a multitude of manufacturers, the M35 model would serve as a prime mover for the U.S. military for 50+ years.

                Although seeing considerable service during the Second World War, the Dodge-designed ¾-ton WC54 trucks also continued to carry us through the Korean conflict. Abundantly utilized as an ambulance, these WC54 trucks featured 4-wheel-drive abilities as well as an additional area adapted where 6 casualties could be seated. Dodge didn’t stop there though; they also made their M37 models as another adaption of their well-known WC-series, which fought fiercely during the Korean War. These M37 trucks tested their toughness by taking on tasks ranging from command trucks to airfield firefighting apparatus; but also played a primary part in troop transportation.

                Tons of thousands of Willy’s Jeeps from World War II were also transferred to the Korean Theater of War; and in practice, these Jeeps and her counterparts were called upon with unmatched utility in a variety of multi-role vehicles. Taking on tasks including reconnaissance, police patrol, security, and so forth; the Jeeps also justified themselves as first-class carriers of cargo, weapons, personnel and troops.

                Wherever America fought, the jeep followed – and regardless of its renowned reputation for reliability, the truck still faced a few tactical limitations like the lethal lack of a roll bar, inadequately advanced amphibious abilities and poor passenger protection. A little later, these Willy’s would be replaced by the M38 and M38A1 models, or the MC and MD, respectively, which soon became the standard U.S. Army Jeep throughout the continuation of the Korean conflict.

                The massive model M26 tank transporter also made its appearance during the Korean War. Carrying a crew of 7 in a compact, cramped cab these tank transporting trucks took on the most trying of tasks at a towering 11 feet tall and 10 feet wide. Renowned for its rugged recovery abilities, the M26 was a monstrosity that required not only mechanically-inclined crew members able to make rapid repairs under fire on the front lines, but also gunners and guides for the driver as this giant beast of a big rig was rather difficult to drive.

                Deemed the “Dragon Wagon,” although not for its dependable dragging and tow truck capabilities; the truck coined the term because of the fierce bursts of fiery flames that would blow forth from the trucks mighty exhaust like a Dragon. Also during this time, the M26 truck was paired with the M15 trailer, primarily produced by the Pacific Car and Foundry Company. The Dragon Wagon was a design that was well beyond its years and would blend in well on today’s battlefields with its sleek, sloped armored appearance.   

                 Another American-manufactured armored military model is the M39, which was made by the Buick division of the General Motors Company and saw service in the Korean conflict. In fact, these vehicles played a vital role transporting troops to isolated outposts during the latter defensive phase of the war. These utility vehicles also used a modified M18 Hellcat chassis, originally designed as a prime mover for the M5 anti-tank gun, although eventually evolved into a variety of vocational uses as ambulances and ammo carriers.

                Speaking of evolving… eventually the M39 models were found to have a few flaws and faults, including open tops with unnecessary vulnerability to enemy fire. Because of this, a brand-new M75 model was built by International Harvester to replace the M39’s role and featured a freshly-designed fully-enclosed cab.

                 The fight finally ended formally in July of 1953 after just over 3 years, with the signing of the Korean Armistice Agreement; although no peace treaty ever took place, and to this day the 2 Koreas continue their ongoing conflict on considerably calmer terms. The Korean War concluded with approximately 3 million casualties and a larger proportion of civilian deaths than that of World War II and the Vietnam War combined; and is among the most destructive conflicts of the modern era.

                After the Korean conflict, the half-track truck hay-day had come and go; and in came innovative Infantry Fighting Vehicles or IFVs, as well as more advanced Armored Personnel Carriers or APCs. As these all-new vehicle variants took center stage, we saw the subtle shift towards more tech-savvy trucks. 

Outro:

                Thank you all so much for watching our brand-new Trucks of War series featuring the trucks of the Korean War. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We have finally reached our goal of 20K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show! Next stop, 50K 😉

            If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our podcast “The Chrome Corner” Wednesday’s at 12PM/NOON EST, and join Dave and Maddie as they answer viewer’s questions and discuss all things chrome! 😉

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We still have our Truck History shirts available on our website, so be sure to check them out! Save stacks on stacks at jackschromeshop.com with the all-new RoadWorks Exhaust kits for Peterbilt and Kenworth Trucks. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!” 

Trucks of War: Gulf War – Desert Storm:

Intro:

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we are back with a brand new episode of Trucks of War. In this series, we will be guiding you through the guys and gore of the wartime warriors that helped drive the U.S. military and mold the modern-day model of truck manufacturing. Continuing on after our Trucks of the Vietnam War video, today we are diving into the Trucks of the Gulf War – Desert Storm. But before we get started, this video was made possible by our online chrome shop, jackschromeshop.com. Be sure to stop the site and sweep through our selection of sales including 10% off bumpers, visors, exhaust, steering wheels and so much more and remember folks… “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Body:

                At the dawn of the new decade in early August of 1990, following 5 months of lead-up under the preliminary “Operation Desert Shield” phase; the Gulf War gave way when the combat phase, codename “Operation Desert Storm,” waged an attack against Iraq in response to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, due to ongoing oil pricing and production disputes. After teaming together with UK prime minister Margaret Thatcher to send troops to Saudi Arabia, President George H.W. Bush began encouraging other countries to do the same, eventually evolving into the largest military alliance ever since World War II. The Gulf War also marked the launch of live news broadcasts from the front lines of battle, earning the notable “Video Game War” nickname due to the daily images broadcast from cameras aboard U.S. bombers.

                Despite starting some 15 years after the Vietnam War, many military models would make yet another appearance in the great Gulf War as well. If you’ll recall from our Trucks of the Vietnam War video, the historic High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle or “Humvee,” for short, that eventually evolved from the beloved Jeep’s towards the end of the war with Vietnam, would make many more appearances as the main military model used moving forward. Primarily produced by a company called AM General, located in South Bend, IN, only a hop, skip and a jump away from our home here at Jack’s Chrome; more than 72,000 of these models were made and shipped overseas to both U.S. and foreign militaries.

                This top tactical truck, although designed primarily for personnel and light cargo carrying behind the front lines, proved to be a pretty vicious fighting vehicles that saw widespread use in the Gulf War navigating treacherous desert terrain. The Humvee’s hard-headed abilities to take on daunting trucking tasks in the dry desert heat, inspired an all-new civilian “Hummer” version to be created in 1992, based on none other than the magnificent M998 model.

                Speaking of other major military models… you might recall the renowned M35 2 ½ -ton 6x6 “Deuce and a Half” cargo trucks from fights dating all the way back to as early as 1944. The most used M35 model used by the military in the Gulf War was the M35A2, which also served as basis used for several of the “gun trucks” we talked about in our Vietnam video. Additionally, going back to AM General, the company also produced another 6x6 truck, this time a 5-ton M939 heavy-duty model made for the U.S. military to haul heavier loads of over 10,000 lbs. as cargo carriers, wreckers, and more.

                The Gulf War and Operation Desert Storm also opened up an opportunity for an all-new “Fast Attack Vehicle” to be adopted, with the ¼ -ton 4x4 M151 model. These M151 models were also made by AM General, as well as other companies like Ford, as a successor to the M38 jeeps but were built with improved, integrated frames. The main M151 model used was the M151A2, a “Fast Attack Vehicle” variant designed to be held within a specialized heavy-lift CH-53 helicopter.

                Other “Fast Attack Vehicles,” or “FAV’s,” fought in the Desert Storm fight, also known as “Desert Patrol Vehicles,” or “DPV’s.” These “Desert Patrol Vehicles” were lightly-armored, high-speed sand-rail-like vehicles that debuted in combat for the first time during the Gulf War; and due to their dash speed and outstanding off-road abilities, were utilized extensively over the course of Operation Desert Storm. In fact, the first U.S. forces to enter Kuwait City during Desert Storm were Navy SEALs in DPVs.

                In addition to many all-newly adopted tactical military truck models, tons of tanks were also added to the long line-up of vehicles that would ultimately lead the U.S. to victory. The most popularly produced makes and models included “Infantry Fighting Vehicles,” or “IFVs,” like the M2A2 Bradley, “Cavalry Fighting Vehicles” like the M3 Bradley, main battle tanks such as the M1 Abrams series, and a variety of other armored vehicles. Bradley also brought in a rather interesting rig called the M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System, or “M.L.R.S.,” that looked like a cross between a tank truck and a shipping container, which was strapped with a total of 12 rockets that spread what the Iraqi soldiers supposedly referred to as “steel rain.”

                Also, as an abundance of aerial attacks occurred especially earlier on towards the beginning of the battle, an array of aircrafts including helicopters like the Boeing AH-64A Apache and the Sikorsky UH-60A Black Hawk were brought to the battle. Anti-aircrafts like the model M48 Chaparral Self-Propelled Surface-to-Air Missile Launcher as well as the M1097 Avenger version of the Humvee were also used. In addition to aerial attacking, an array of advanced assault amphibious vehicles or AAV-7 series saw successful use during the liberation of Kuwait and subsequent destruction of the Iraqi Army.

                The fight finally ended on February 28th, 1991, only 5 weeks after Operation Desert Storm opened up. Following a final ground assault on the 24th of February, the coalition forces declared victory after advancing into Iraqi territory and liberating the country of Kuwait. Moving ahead to March 10th, 540,000 U.S. troops began moving out of the Gulf, taking the tried-and-true tactical trucks and their tales with them.

                In fact, many of the more timeless military models, such as the historic “Humvee,” would continue to carry the military as one of their top-tier trucks for many years and conflicts to come. Additionally, many all-new model adaptions would make their way onto the military market, including a vast variety of improved Bradley’s M3 vehicles, and several other updated versions of the most popularly produced military makes and models. 

Outro:

                Thank you all so much for watching our brand new Trucks of the Desert Storm – Gulf War video. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We have finally reached our goal of 25K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show! Next stop, 50K 😉

            If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our podcast “The Chrome Corner” Wednesday’s at 12PM/NOON EST, and join Dave and Maddie as they answer viewer’s questions and discuss all things chrome! 😉

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Be sure to buy your big rig the best Chrome for your Home with some sweet stainless sales on our website at jackschromeshop.com. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Trucks of War – Afghan & Iraqi War:

Intro:

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we are back with a brand new episode of Trucks of War. Continuing on after our Trucks of the Gulf War: Desert Storm video, today we are talking all about the Trucks of the Afghan & Iraqi War. But before we get started, this video was made possible by our online chrome shop, jackschromeshop.com. Be sure to stop the site and sweep through our selection of sales including 10% off bumpers, visors, exhaust, steering wheels and so much more and remember folks… “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Body:

                The Afghan and Iraq War initially began in early 2003, after the U.S. invasion of Iraq and subsequent overthrow of Saddam Hussein’s regime. This attack was largely based on the assertion that Iraq supposedly possessed an active weapons of mass destruction program that posed a threat to the U.S. as well as other allies. Although ultimately Iraq admitted they did not possess such weaponry, the war waged on for well over 8 years and utilized a unique mix of military models ranging from the historic “Humvees” to the more recently released “Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected” or “MRAP” light tactical trucks.

                Unfortunately, the Humvee’s were hit hard in Iraq and suffered heavy losses due to regular ambush attacks by Iraqi insurgents. Because of this asymmetric warfare, these big rigs were built into bigger and badder re-invented “gun trucks” similar to the ones seen way back in the Vietnam War. In Iraq, these improvised gun trucks were called “redneck ironclads” as well as “hillbilly armor,” and much like the gunners used in Vietnam, each one of these trucks were 100% original. The most popularly used Humvee model M998, also made for the most typical gun-truck base. The other primary platform for these gun trucks was the M939 5-ton truck, which was also used extensively in the Gulf War during Desert Storm.  

                Another major model was the M1114, which featured fully-armored factory-built add-ons and other advanced tactical abilities. Certainly, more interesting gun trucks were also created – including the iconic mix and match model constructed on the chassis of an M809 automobile, built with the body of a tracked M113 truck. Aside from the various army vehicle variants, a couple of car company’s procured contracts to make military models, including Ford, whose F-350 truck found use as a utility vehicle often equipped with exterior armor and armed with weaponry.  

                The improved and up-armored M1151 Humvee also proved a popular pick amongst other 5-ton gun trucks up until the introduction of the innovative “Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected” or “MRAP” vehicles. These MRAPs were introduced in response to the increased threat of IEDs during the war with Iraq, and began replacing most gun trucks towards the end of 2008, as they were designed exclusively to withstand a wide variety of explosive attacks and ambushes.

                One of the first MRAP models to make its debut in the military, was the M1117 Guardian, which was an armored security vehicle based on the classic Cadillac Gage Commando V-100 series armored cars of the Vietnam War. Among the most popular MRAP models were the Navistar International MaxxPro, the Force Protection Cougar H, as well as multiple mine-resistant utility vehicles built by BAE Systems.

                 In addition to the all-new MRAPs being adopted, many Heavy Equipment Transport models like the M915 tractor also arrived around the same time. Aside from the almighty M915 heavy truck, other big bad transport trucks like the 8-wheel M1070 models were made, mainly by the Oshkosh truck manufacturing corporation. These trucks and their M1000 semi-trailers were quickly converted to gun trucks too, among other improvised gun trucks including upgraded tipper trucks. Considering the tippers provided pretty good protection even prior to their armored advancements, these trucks quickly proved to be perfectly-suited for this purpose – especially the model M817.

                Other 8-wheeled war trucks called “Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Trucks” or “HEMTT’s” were also often converted into armored gun trucks. Although these gun trucks were giant indeed, they weren’t the biggest gun trucks to grace the likes of the Iraqi War – in fact, the largest model in Iraq was created as a conversion of the HEMTT trucks, called the “Palletized Load System” or “PLS” truck. These PLS trucks possessed a pallet platform and 2 additional wheels, which often carried a small crew of soldiers loaded with machine guns and grenade launchers.

                Speaking of the biggest rigs used in Iraq… One of the largest armored recovery vehicles, the M88 Recovery Vehicle, (more specifically the most modern M88A2 model), was used extensively throughout the entirety of the conflict. Based on the exceedingly popular previously produced Patton tanks, these M88 trucks took on the primarily role of repairing or replacing damaged parts on vehicles while under fire, as well as providing relief and recovery for vehicles that had become bogged down or ruined completely.

                The Stryker family of vehicles fills a specific role in the military as an extra-special 8-wheeler that is neither heavy nor light; capable of altering the pressure in all 8 tires in order to suit all types of terrain. First introduced in Iraq in October of 2003, these Strykers saw huge success following their debut and were known for their seamless ability to fill the growing high-mobility gap between main battle tanks and armored personnel carriers. Many versions of the Stryker vehicles were made, including a vast variety of recon vehicles, ranging all the way to more advanced anti-tank trucks; with the most popular model being the basic armored personnel M1126 Infantry Carrier Vehicle.

                The fight finally ended inconclusively after over 8 years on December 18th, 2011. Despite the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Iraq in late 2011, tensions still remained relatively high for years to come. Although we made many strides in military materials with innovative introductions such as the mighty MRAP vehicles, such strides were not seen subsequent to the war with Iraq. In fact, eventually in 2014, things re-escalated to the point the U.S. forces returned yet again for further fights in Iraq.

                Not only was the war itself rather messy –the mess regarding military models and their return to the states also caused a slew of issues. Once the war was over and the troops started their trek back home, tons of military models were left land-locked across the globe in Afghanistan and Iraq. With each truck costing as much as $107,000 to transport and many damaged beyond repair if not completely destroyed – the only options were to continue to transport tons of trucks characterized as “uneconomical to return or repair” back to the states, or allow our hard-earned military equipment to enter into the hands of our enemies.

                Unfortunately, due to the expensive and time-consuming transport process, many military models and other mine-resistant trucks remain in or around Iraq and Afghanistan to this day and were also seen again in the subsequent war with Iraq that took place from 2014-2017. Luckily, our military and many other companies under contract to create more tactical truck models, continue to launch the next level of new wartime workhorses.

Outro:

                Thank you all so much for watching our brand new Trucks of the Afghan & Iraqi War video. Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We have finally reached our goal of 25K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show! Next stop, 50K 😉 If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our live podcast “The Chrome Corner” Wednesday’s at 12PM/NOON EST, and discuss all things chrome with our host Dave Coleman! 😉

            If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Be sure to buy your big rig the best Chrome for your Home with some sweet stainless sales on our website at jackschromeshop.com. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Jack’s Chrome Show Episode .5 – Introduction to The Jack’s Chrome Show and Episode 1 Teaser – Script

Writer: David Coleman

Front camera angle focus on table and host David.  Social media overlay pop up with David’s social media handles.  Every 10-20 seconds cutting between main head-on camera angle, and side camera angle.

Truckers have access to millions of different parts and accessories to trick out their rigs and add a little shine to their home on wheels.  Stacks, bumpers, fenders, lug nut covers… you name it, there’s something out there for everybody.  But, have you ever wondered which products hold up to the demanding conditions truckers face every day?  We’re going to answer that question, and many more, here on the Jack’s Chrome Show!

Intro animation with moving logo and episode blurb

Hello and welcome to the show, I’m your host David Coleman.  I wanted to name the show “Dave’s Chrome Show” but… that didn’t really work out.  So, here we are on the Jack’s Chrome Show.  This is just the intro episode and teaser for our first real show dropping this coming Wednesday , July 18th where I’ll be reviewing the Roadworks Manufacturingpunched stainless grill insert for the Peterbilt 389.  Look for new episodes of Jack’s Chrome Show every Monday and Friday after that!

Today’s teaser film is of course sponsored by Jack’s Chrome Shop.  If you’re interested in upgrading your truck in any way, check out our beautiful website JacksChromeShop.com and browse our selection of thousands of truck parts & accessories.  New customers receive 10% off their first order when they use promocode JCS1234 at checkout.  Link will be in the video description below.  While you’re down there, if you liked this video and you’re excited to see me review some of the coolest chrome on the planet, give this video a thumbs up and subscribe to the channel.  Also down in the video description you’ll find links to our merch store and social media.  Thank you for watching and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Reviewed by:

Date:

 

10 Things You Didn’t Know About… D.O.T.:

Intro:

                Hey guys it’s Maddie and today we have episode #12 of 10 Things You Didn’t Know About… For this episode we decided to do a little bit of a different (and rather controversial) topic to honor Friday the 13th today. Despite being largely disliked by many, they are without a doubt a necessary evil that everybody loves to hate. Buckle up y’all, because today we are bringing you 10 fun facts you didn’t know about… the Department of Transportation/D.O.T.

Body:

  1. The Department of Transportation or D.O.T. for short, was established over 50 years ago in 1966 when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed it into law as a federal cabinet of the U.S. government. The D.O.T. began operations on April 1st, 1967, and although much to the dismay of many truckers, was *NOT* an April Fools joke. 😉
  2. The D.O.T. has many different administrations in which it governs including the Federal Aviation Administration, Federal Highway Administration, and many others. In fact, before the Department of Homeland Security was created in 2002 as a response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the United States Coast Guard was operated by the D.O.T. In 2003, the United States Coast Guard was formally transferred to the Department of Homeland Security.
  3. Speaking of former D.O.T. administrations, the Transportation Security Administration was also transferred to the Department of Homeland Security in 2003 in addition to the U.S. Coast Guard. Also, the Surface Transportation Board or STB for short, spun off as an independent federal agency and separated from the D.O.T. in 2015.
  4. In 2017, Elaine Chao was named the 18th United States Secretary of Transportation. Prior to her Secretary of Transportation role, Chao served under President George H.W. Bush as U.S. Deputy Secretary of Transportation from 1989-1991, as well as the 24th U.S. Secretary of Labor from 2001-2009 under President George W. Bush. Chao was the first Asian American woman and the first Chinese American in history to be appointed to a President’s cabinet. Even Chao’s personal life seems to be consumed by politics, as she has been married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell since 1993. There have been some controversies surrounding the Republican couple and their family, including Chao’s father, a shipping magnate with extensive business interests in China.
  5. The FMCSA or Federal Motor Carrier Safety Act was created within the D.O.T. in 1999 in hopes to further improve the safety of commercial drivers and reduce the number, as well as severity of accidents involving large trucks. Since their inception, the FMCSA has implemented numerous regulations on the trucking industry, many of which have not been very well-received by drivers and trucking advocates alike. The FMCSA is heavily involved in many controversial trucking topics such as hours of service, log books, and speed limiting.
  6. Many of you have heard of the legendary trucker musician, Mr. Bill Weaver. Bill’s song “Mr.DOT” is a song about the D.O.T. from a trucker’s P.O.V. The song goes a little something like this… “…” In addition to that banger, Bill sings all kinds of songs that are perfect for being “Out on the Road.”  Speaking of “Out on the Road” with Bill Weaver, be sure to check out Bill’s show on Chrome and Steel Radio to catch exclusive #Weavertime content! 😉
  7. In 1983, the first ever female Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole, took office and quickly got to work on many new policies. The very next year in 1984, marked a ground-breaking year of major changes for the D.O.T. with the implementation of safety belt laws, airbag regulations and a national drinking age. This “trifecta” bill was signed into law on July 11th that year and is responsible for saving the lives of hundreds of thousands of individuals in the years since.
  8. In 2015, the Center for Effective Government (now folded into the Project On Government Oversight), published an analysis of 15 federal agencies which receive the most Freedom of Information Act requests, which requires full or partial disclosure of previously unreleased information and documents controlled by the government. The D.O.T. scored 65 out of 100 possible points, earning an unsatisfactory overall letter grade of a “D.” Needless to say, the D.O.T. hasn’t exactly done the greatest job keeping true to itself and others, and definitely could stand room for further improvements.
  9. The Department of Transportation holds an annual budget of $72.4 billion. Of that budget, the biggest spenders within the D.O.T. are the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Aviation Administration. For example, for the 2016 Fiscal Year, the Federal Highway Administration was funded over $43,000 million, and the Federal Aviation Administration was funded approximately $16,000 million.
  10. Many drivers have their own personal views on which state has the toughest crack-down on hours of service violations. However, according to statistics from overdriveonline.com, Arkansas seems to be the biggest bullies when it comes to cracking down on hours of service violations. Other notable mentions include but are not limited to: North Dakota, Wyoming, Oregon, Kansas, Indiana, Iowa, South Dakota, Georgia, and Arizona. What state have y’all struggled the most with? Let us know in the comment section which state has given you the hardest time! 😉

Outro:

                Thank you so much for watching our 10 Things You Didn’t Know About the D.O.T. and Happy Friday the 13th! Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We recently reached our goal of 10,000 subscribers and ironically enough are quickly reaching 13K, just in time for our special Friday the 13th episode! 😊 We’re so grateful for all your support for the show! Next stop, 20K subscribers! 😉  

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you haven’t already, please consider purchasing a Truck History shirt on JacksChromeShow.com. Christmas is only two weeks away and they make great gifts! If you’re in the mood for some chrome, drop by our online chrome shop at JacksChromeShop.com and save on your order by using the discount code “YouTube” at check out. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Trucking in the Future – 100 Years of Trucking:

Intro:

                Hey guys it’s Maddie! We thought we’d continue our 100 Years of Trucking series with a follow up video. Trucking is quickly changing with technology and legislation – in this video we’ll review some of the upcoming advancements and changes that could occur in the 2020s and beyond. But before we dive in, we have a special announcement for you. We recently hit 20,000 subscribers – a milestone we never thought we’d reach. We love making truck videos just as much as you guys love watching them. Recently, we’ve made the switch to releasing two videos a week instead of our regular one. Because of our growth we’ve added extra staff and equipment to help expedite video production. If you’ve enjoyed our videos this far and you’d like to help us create more videos, join our Patreon community by visiting Patreon.com/jackschromeshow. Those of you who become patrons will be treated to our newest video series “Trucking Culture”. The first episode features everyone’s favorite trucking movie – Smokey and the Bandit and will be released on Patreon ONLY May 1st. Those who join will also receive free decals, t-shirts, and truck posters. More details are coming in next Friday’s video but for those interested in helping us grow the channel and create more truck videos, please visit the Patreon.com/jackschromeshow link in the description and join our community. Let’s get back to Trucking in the Future!

Body:

Trucking changed so much during the 2010s and a lot of the advancements during that time will most certainly be continued in the 2020s and beyond. For instance – the push towards automation and increased efficiency will continue in the coming decades. Autonomous trucks have been on the horizon for what seems like decades. How close are these autonomous trucks? It’s hard to say but some estimates point towards the 2030s when autonomous trucks will officially hit the road en masse. But, before we get into the fully autonomous part of this video, let’s first cover some of the upcoming models you’ll see with a driver behind the wheel.

Both Peterbilt and Kenworth have a long history of creating legendary rigs for their customers. Comfort, style, and power wrapped up into one machine. Though these machines make for great show trucks – Paccar tends to keep their model lines for quite some time without significant updates. For instance, the W900 series has been in production for nearly 60 years! With the release of Kenworth’s new flagship model – the W990 – in 2019, it is almost guaranteed that Paccar has their eyes set on refreshing and redesigning their Peterbilt long-hood series, soon. There have been rumors around the industry for years speculating when Peterbilt will release their new flagship, but many sources expect it to be within the next couple years! How sad would you be if Peterbilt replaced the 389 with something more along the lines of the W990? Let us know in the comments below.

Tesla – made a huge splash on November 16, 2017 when owner, Elon Musk, revealed their futuristic Tesla Semi design. The completely electric semi project is being led by Jerome Guillen – former Daimler executive and head developer of the Freightliner Cascadia truck program. The futuristic looking Tesla Semi has a claimed range of 500 miles on a single charge and can accelerate from 0-60 in five seconds without a load. Though the concept of the Tesla Semi was released in 2017, testing and other production delays pushed the build date back to Q4 of 2020.

As of April 2018 several fortune 500 companies including Walmart, Pepsi, Anheuser-Bush, FedEx, Sysco, UPS, DHL, Meijer, and Ryder have all reserved initial units of the Tesla Semi. The truck will go on sale during Q4 of this year at a price around $150,000 – Or you can get the premium “founders’ series” Tesla semi for 200 grand.

A major sticking point for early adopters of the Tesla truck is the availability of charging stations. Truck stops can be found at just about every exit on the interstate highway system. Each one carrying thousands of gallons of diesel fuel. For the Tesla semi to be able to travel freely throughout the country, it will need a similar network of Tesla charging stations to keep the truck running. Another road block could be the time it takes to charge the Semi. Many believe that Tesla semis will take 8+ hours of charging before they can be put back in service. That simply won’t do for drivers trying to turn loads quickly.

Another such “Future Truck” is the Nikola One. A competitor to the Tesla Semi, this hydrogen fuel cell powered truck was originally projected to release in 2020 with a 1200 mile range. Since then Nikola has released a second version of the truck called Nikola Two which has a more modest range claim of 500-750 miles and is powered by a hybrid hydrogen fuel cell system. Nikola has projected a release date of 2022 for the Nikola Two truck.

Nikola addressed some of the criticism leveled at Tesla in their Nikola Two truck by including “refueling the hydrogen truck will take just 15 minutes at any of the 700 hydrogen refueling stations that Nikola has promised to build”.

As rates for shipping and driver’s pay have declined over time, solutions to the problem have popped up. Fewer and fewer men and women are willing to live with the lifestyle trade offs and lower pay. Because of this, an ever-increasing driver shortage began developing during the 2010s and will continue to increase through the 2020s. One solution to the driver shortage that has been proposed is automation and limiting or removing the driver from the cab all-together.

The problem many autonomous trucks have a hard time with is constantly changing road conditions and unexpected events. It is just simply too difficult for a computer to navigate through heavy traffic, construction zones, or unexpected obstacles on the road. Though many autonomous truck companies are trying to work through these issues it may be the case that a driver will always be needed – possibly only for city driving and docking.

Though at the current moment autonomous trucks are not fully functional, many tech companies worked tirelessly in the 2010s to develop and test autonomous technologies.  In-fact in 2016 Uber Freight and Anheuser-Busch transported 45,000 cans of Budweiser beer over 120 miles with no driver behind the wheel at any point during the trip. Though this short trip was a proof of concept – it certainly does not mean that autonomous trucks are ready for the road.

A more recent test – in late 2019 by tech start up Plus.ai is being called “the first commercial freight cross-country trip by an autonomous truck”. The 2800 mile journey from Tulure, CA to Quakertown, PA for Land O’Lakes took under three days and was smooth – just like it’s cargo. A driver and trip engineer were present during the drive, just in case. It was stated that there was zero interruptions of the autonomous driving during the 2800 mile drive – though many stops had to be made during the trip for technical or testing reasons.

There is still plenty of work to be done for the truck driver. Clearly, autonomous technologies are still a way off and the competitive nature of the transportation industry demands more and more drivers every year. As we move into the 2020s and coming decades we are hopeful for the trucking industry and excited to see new faces and technologies.

Outro:

                Thank you all so much for watching this decade of our new series 100 Years of Trucking – “Trucking in the 2010’s.” Before you leave, make sure you like the video, check out the other videos on our channel, and subscribe. We have finally reached our goal of 20K subscribers, so thank you all so much for your support for the show! Next stop, 50K 😉

                If you have any questions, comments, concerns or anything else you’d like to talk to us about; please be sure to tune into our podcast “The Chrome Corner” Wednesday’s at 12PM/NOON EST, and join Dave and Maddie as they answer viewer’s questions and discuss all things chrome! 😉

                If you’d like to stay up to date with the new projects we have coming, follow us at @jackschromeshow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We still have our Truck History shirts available on our website, so be sure to check them out! Save stacks on stacks at jackschromeshop.com with the all-new RoadWorks Exhaust kits for Peterbilt and Kenworth Trucks. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next week and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!” 

 

International History

Hey guys we are back with another Truck History video. We didn’t realize how popular this series was, but for now it’s here to stay! We plan on continuing through the rest of the makes and models, mixing in some surprises like today’s video. Today we are recapping the history of International Harvester Company and doing a little update on International Trucks and what they’re up to. We are very excited to present Truck History Episode 5. Let’s get started.

 

Let’s jump back in time 117 years to 1902, when, five Chicago-based farm machinery companies merged to become International Harvester Company. The new company had dealers and plants throughout the mid-west. In 1907 they released the Auto-Buggy, a small vehicle designed for rural roads and conditions. The Auto Buggy was the first powered vehicle built by International Harvester. It was designed for farmers using poor rural roads. The vehicle was a light wooden buggy with a primitive gasoline engine mounted below the body. Tall wooden-spoke wheels had iron treads on a wooden rim. Later, pneumatic tires could be fitted and seats could be mounted in the rear for two more passengers. These early International Harvester machines were often called "Highwheelers". Next up, the Auto Wagon was introduced in 1909. It was essentially an Auto Buggy with a wagon body. Then came the Model F, introduced in 1913, which was a completely different type of truck than the Auto Wagon. It had a steel ladder frame with beam axles on semi-elliptic leaf springs. A front-mounted, water-cooled engine drove through a four-speed transmission and driveshaft to a geared differential rear axle. There were also external band brakes on the rear wheels. The F model had a "Renault-type" tapered hood with the radiator behind the engine, just like the one found on the infamous Mack AC "Bulldog" truck. Throughout the 1920s trucks began to develop a common layout; a water-cooled engine with a front mounted radiator. In 1936, the C series was introduced as a brand new range of trucks that brought in a newly styled, all-steel cab. There were also many mechanical advances during its production including hydraulic service brakes. The C-series was replaced by the D Series in 1937, a range of light, medium, and heavy-duty trucks with new rounded styling and a new cab with a two-piece V-shaped windshield. As World War II begins, the K series is introduced in 1940 as a complete range of trucks similar to that of the D series of 1937, with some cosmetic changes. The K series was built in large numbers during World War II for civilians, military personnel, and the Lend-Lease export. In 1947 the K was updated as the KB. When the war was over, the truck was slightly updated again and sold until the new post-war designs were introduced in 1949. The KB was then replaced by the L series in 1949. The L-series was the first complete range of new trucks since the war, and they introduced a cab with a one-piece curved windshield as well as were the first trucks to sport the “IH” logo. The L-series was later replaced by the R Series in 1952, an update of the L series, with the same cab, cosmetic changes to the front end, and more engines available. Shortly thereafter came the V series, which was a range of heavy-duty high-power trucks introduced a year later in 1953. It used the same cab as the R and L series, but had a shorter hood with a large rectangular grill opening, specifically developed for a new, much bigger V8 type engine. In 1957, the A series was introduced as a line of light and medium-duty trucks and a special A-100 Golden Jubilee Model was released which had a gold and white paint scheme, modern styling and introduced a new, wider cab that would be used until 1976. Crew-cabs were also made available. A 1959 update, changed the name from the A series to the B series. A variant, the AC/BC, was a modified conventional with the cab mounted higher on the frame and a shorter hood. The new decade brought a new range of named series trucks and in 1962, both the Loadstar and the Fleetstar were introduced.  The Loadstar was a medium-duty short-hood conventional truck, and when it debuted, it had a grey grill with a “butterfly” hood.  The cab, also used on the Fleetstar, had been introduced on the A series in 1957. Primarily used for local delivery, construction, farming, and as a semi-tractor; with its all wheel drive, it was also useful for fire engines, snow-plows, and utility work. The Fleetstar was the heavy-duty version of the Loadstar with the cab, grey grill and “butterfly” hood, all remaining the same. The Fleetstar was used as both a local straight truck with mid-range engines and as a semi-tractor with heavy-duty engines. The Transtar CO4070 cab-over-engine models were heavy-duty over-the-road semi-tractors introduced in 1968. The raised cab offered in the model, allowed for high-powered diesel engines to be used. The Cargostar was a forward control cab-over-engine medium-duty series introduced in 1970, and would replace the Loadstar. The Cargostar had an improved cab and heavier models. The Cargostar's maneuverability made it useful in cities as straight trucks, and larger models excelled as local semi-tractors. The Transtar 4200/4300 was a heavy-duty long hood conventional introduced in 1971. It had a new cab, and a large forward tilting rectangular hood with a very large grill area. The Transtar was used as a semi-tractor for local construction, regional hauling, and long distance over-the-road trucking. The Paystar was a severe service conventional rig introduced the next year in 1972. It used the same cab as the Transtar and had a long, rectangular hood. It had a set-back front axle with a butterfly hood and flat diamond plate fenders. In 1973, a set-forward front axle model with a tilting fiberglass hood was added. The Paystar was commonly used for straight trucks like heavy-duty dump trucks, concrete mixers, and off-road fire apparatus. Next came the S-Series which were a range of medium and heavy-duty conventional trucks introduced in 1977, to replace and widen the Loadstar and Fleetstar lines. It used a new cab with flat panels and forward tilting hood in different lengths. The S-series was the last International truck to have a gasoline engine and had a very wide range of sizes with loaded weights from 19,500,000 to 54,000 pounds. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, despite good sales, IH's profit margins remained slim. In 1979, IH named a new CEO, who was determined to improve profit margins and drastically cut ballooning costs. Unprofitable model lines were terminated, and factory production curtailed. By the end of the year, IH profits were at their highest in 10 years, but cash reserves were still too low, which led to a 6-month long strike starting November 2, 1979. When it ended, IH had lost almost $600 million. By 1981, the company's finances were at their lowest point ever. This same year, they release the CO9000 series, which was a heavy-duty cab-over-engine highway tractor. In 1984, following long negotiations, International Harvester agreed to sell selected assets of its agricultural products division to Tenneco, Inc. and in 1986, Tenneco's J. I. Case division, changed the corporate name to Navistar International Corporation and adopted the new “Diamond Road” logo. After the transition from International Harvester to Navistar, the truck product line dropped the "Harvester" portion of the brand name. Also during this time in 1984, a new 9000i Series heavy-duty semi-tractor was introduced as a replacement for the Transtar model. They used an aluminum day-cab also used by the Paystar conventional and had a long rectangular hood. Most were set-forward front axle models, but in 1989 a set-back front axle with a lower-profile hood was introduced. When used for long-distances an external "box" type sleeper could be fitted. Additionally, the long hood and large grill area allowed the largest highway engines to be used. The 9000i were almost exclusively used as semi-tractors but a few straight trucks were built. In 1987, the 8000 Series, heavy-duty semi-tractors were introduced. They used an S Series cab with a low-profile hood, and a set-back front axle allowed the front fenders to be tapered and low-drag. The 4000 Series were medium duty trucks introduced in 1988 that used the same S Series cab with a new low-profile hood also used in the 8000, to further improve driver visibility and reduce air resistance. 4000 Series trucks were made available in both day and crew cabs and were commonly used for local delivery and vocational work but there were also semi-tractor, service, and specialty models. Under Navistar’s new namesake, International trucks continue to coast through the 90s. Most trucks used the same series number names as the trucks they replaced, but in 2006-2007 almost all were renamed with "Star" at the end of the name. At the turn of the century, the company introduces the new “Next Generation Vehicle” models. The 9000i is re-introduced in 2000 and in 2001, both the 4000 and 7000 models are re-released. The 4000, later renamed the DuraStar, is a medium-duty truck, and although available with tandem rear axles or semi-tractors, most have single rear axles and are used in local delivery and service. The 7000, later renamed the WorkStar, is a heavy-duty, primarily vocational truck. This model is typically used as dump trucks, concrete mixer trucks and semi-tractors. Both the “DuraStar” and the “WorkStar”, have the "New Generation Vehicle" all-steel cab available as day, extended, and crew cab models. Introduced in 2002 as the 8000 Series and later renamed the “TranStar,” the truck is a heavy-duty highway semi-tractor. A set-back front axle allowed a short low drag hood, but on the other hand, the short hood limited engine availability. In 2006, the ProStar is released. A heavy-duty highway semi-tractor, it uses the “New Generation Vehicle” cab introduced 5 years prior, and is available as a day cab with different fairings and sleepers. Skipping ahead a decade, between 2016 and 2018 all models were updated with small cosmetic and mechanical changes and renamed without "Star". Some weights on comparable models were increased but the entire range was largely unchanged. The first to be updated was the PayStar, which in 2016, became the severe-duty, HX Series. The HX uses the same aluminum cab as the PayStar did, and are also available in both set-forward and set-back axles. Next to be updated were the WorkStar, ProStar, and TranStar models which would become the HV, LT, and RH models in 2017. All of these trucks use the “New Generation Vehicle” cab introduced in 2001, with some cosmetic changes included. Another striking new feature in these trucks were the one-piece door window as opposed to the earlier two-piece windows. In 2018, the MV series was released to replace the DuraStar model. These trucks also sported the “New Generation Vehicle” cab and one-piece door window. Lastly, International’s newest joint venture with General Motors Company; the CV series, are newly designed medium-duty trucks featuring an entirely new cab and styling. It has both day and crew cab models and are very versatile trucks. Marketed as tow, dump, service and utility trucks, their 4-wheel drive option also lets them be equipped as snow-plows.

 

Thank you so much for watching episode 5 of Truck History! Now that you’re up to speed on all things International trucks, be sure to check out our other 4 episodes of Truck History on our YouTube channel Jack’s Chrome Show as well as our other videos released weekly! Also make sure you like and subscribe while you’re there so you don’t miss any of our future videos! This show is made possible by our online chrome shop, Jack’s Chrome. Stop by JacksChromeShop.com and check out our Freedom Sale going on through the end of July! Now is the time to stock up on some Chrome for your Home with 15-25% off bumpers, hub caps, fenders, headlights, JCS apparel, merch, posters and so much more! That wraps it up for today, folks. Don’t forget to tune into our channel on Monday for our podcast highlights, and check out the live podcast on Chrome and Steel Radio YouTube and Facebook at 12pm EST on Wednesdays and remember, “If your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”

Freightliner History

Introduction:

 

Freightliner has long been viewed as a forerunner in the truck industry. In recent years they’ve become one of the leading brands in fuel efficiency and truck technology. With that being said, we’d like to take a trip back in time. Back to when Freightliner made rugged owner-operator trucks that ruled the 70s, 80s, and 90s. Today on Episode 3 of Truck History we’re talking about Freightliner’s FLC and FLD Trucks.

 

Main Topic: “Before we get into the history of the FLC and FLD models, we need to cover the history of Freightliner as a company. Consolidated Freightways, the predecessor to Freightliner Corp, had a distribution agreement with White Motor Company, but, in the early 70s the relationship between the two companies became strained. Coincidentally about this time, Consolidated Freightways and White Motor Company were about to release their first conventional style truck. Up until then they’d only made Cab Over Engine trucks. The Federal regulations on height and length restricted the longer conventional style trucks from use. Thankfully, many regulations were lifted or redefined later in the 70s which allowed larger, conventional trucks to prevail because of their smoother ride and more comfortable cabs.

The first conventional style truck Freightliner produced was the FLC 120 in 1974. At it’s release it was called the WFC-120 for (White-Freightliner-Conventional with 120” Bumper to Back of Cab) but, after White and the new Freightliner Corp split up, the model was renamed the FLC-120 for Freightliner Conventional. These trucks featured aluminum hoods to save weight and allow easier access to the motor.

Consolidated Freightways, who was a traditional unionized carrier, was under a lot of financial pressure in the early 80s, a time of deregulation. At the same time, Daimler-Benz had been eyeing the Freightliner brand for some time because of the success of the FLC series. In May 1981 it bought Freightliner Corp from Consolidated Freightways.

After the purchase by Daimler, the new company released an updated FLC in 1984. It adopted integrated headlights in the fenders, updates to the cab and interior, and the availability of setback axle models.

The year after, 1985, saw the release of their new FLC 112 models which were a medium conventional truck that featured a shorter bumper-to-back of cab length of 112”. The new FLC112 used the passenger portion of the cabin from the then recently introduced Mercedes-Benz LK signifying Daimler had its hand in the design and manufacture of Freightliners. This is a defining moment in Freightliner’s history because afterwards, their trucks would feature more and more Mercedes cabin features.

In the early to mid 80s, Freightliner began to notice a shift in the industry and customer demands moved from cabovers to conventional, long hood trucks. In response to this change in the market, Freightliner engineers adapted and begun working tirelessly on their first ever aerodynamic, conventional tractor… the FLD. In 1987, a landmark year for Freightliner, the newly restyled, all-aluminum FLD was introduced in both 112” and 120” bumper to back of cab configurations. Shortly after its release, it becomes North America’s best-selling Class-8 truck. Building on the success of the FLD, in 1990, the FLD Classic was released. Geared towards owner-operators who desired the look of a traditional style rig, the FLD Classic stole the hearts of many. In 1992, the FLD 70” Raised Roof Sleeper was introduced and rapidly exceeded any and all sales expectations. The integral stand-up sleeper and what is now known as the raised “condo” roof, were unprecedented at the time. This new, roomier design shook the trucking community and took the market by storm. In 1993, Freightliner introduced the FLD Classic XL, providing an even longer bumper to back of cab length of 132”. The Classic XL was an instant hit and stood toe-to-toe with the Kenworth W900 and Peterbilt 379. But, all good things must come to an end, and as the FLD model sales dropped in the early 2000s, Freightliner looked for ways to retire their owner-operator trucks.

In 2006, the last FLD model was produced by Freightliner. The FLD Classic and Classic Xl models weren’t far behind and were also phased out of production circa 2010. Since the production of the Classic and Classic XL models, Freightliner has continued to move closer and closer to what many consider to be more of the “aero-truck” look. Whether you’re a die-hard long-nose lover, or an all-in aero-truck advocate, I think we can all agree that at one time, Freightliner produced some of the best trucks around.

 

Conclusion: “That wraps it up for this history lesson, folks! If you liked this video, check out our other 2 Truck History Videos on our channel. Also be sure to check out our other chromed out content and let us know of any video or video series you’d like us to do! Finally, like this video and subscribe to our channel so you can catch our new releases. Remember, if your rig don’t shine, you don’t know Jack!”